Courtroom Interpreting

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University Press of America, Sep 15, 2008 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 212 pages
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In Courtroom Interpreting, Marianne Mason offers a new perspective in the study of courtroom interpreting through the exploration of cognitive and linguistic barriers that court interpreters face everyday and ultimately result in an interpreter's deviation from original linguistic content. The quality of an interpreter's rendition plays a key role in how well a non-English speaking defendant's legal rights are served. Interpreters are expected to provide a faithful rendition of all semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic content regardless of how difficult the task may be at a cognitive level. From a legal perspective this expectation may be sound as it disregards the cost associated with the interpreter having to account for a great deal of linguistic content. Mason proposes that if the quality of interpreters' renditions is to improve and the rights of non-English speaking minorities is to be better served the issue of cognitive overload needs to be addressed more effectively by the court interpreting community.
 

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Contents

Chapter 01
1
Chapter 02
13
Chapter 03
19
Chapter 04
41
Chapter 05
61
Chapter 06
75
Chapter 07
95
Appendix1
101
Appendix3
111
Appendix4
115
Appendix5
117
Appendix6
141
Appendix7
149
Bibliography
163
Index
171
Author
175

Appendix2
107

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About the author (2008)

Marianne Mason, (Ph.D.), is Assistant Professor of Modern Languages and Linguistics at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

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