Courts, Patrons and Poets

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David Mateer
Yale University Press, 2000 - History - 383 pages
The princely courts of fifteenth-century Italy played a central role in the development of Renaissance art and culture. After a general introduction to the notion of court patronage, this book examines the phenomenon in detail through case studies of artists and musicians working in Milan under the Sforza (Leonardo, Filarete, and Josquin Desprez) and in Florence under the Medici. Later chapters show how humanist ideas were imported from the Continent to Britain, where they were absorbed and ultimately metamorphosed into the glories of Tudor and Stuart poetry and drama. The result is a stimulating study of the position of artists in society and of their changing relation to, and interaction with, their patrons.
 

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Contents

Court culture in the Renaissance
1
Artists at the Sforza court
97
Fifteenthcentury Florence and court culture
159
Britains Renaissance of letters
227
The London stage
297
Glossary
361
Acknowledgements
368
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About the author (2000)

Mateer is staff tutor and lecturer in music at the Open University.

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