Courtyard Houses: A Housing Typology, Volume 1

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Oct 5, 2007 - Architecture - 112 pages
The waywe live is a directtransformation of social structures, politics, religi onandtoposand, as such, mirrors society. Methodsof construction andma terials employed turn thevarioustypes of residential dwellings into products of the conditionsof their context, e.g. the immediate spatial surroundings, the climate, flora and fauna, etc. Thus, complex house types evolved such as the Greek and Roman peristyle house, the Chinese and Islamiccourtyard house and the various European farmhouse types. The urban structures of districts and housing developments in cities like Berlin, Hamburg, Amster dam, Paris or Venice werefounded on the typological particularities of their residential buildings. Inthe ageof globalisation, it seems that the characteristics of the different types of dwellings with their particular regional features have been forgot ten.Technical innovationsenable andencourage the disappearance of local, passive regulatory systems that weresimpleandecological. Onesimple residential house type is the Black Forest house, which represents a cultural form of living, working, security, and continuity. This house type effectively reacts onthe given conditions, exploitspossibilities, andcombines afarmyard, stable, harvest shed anddwellingto form oneunit underasingle roof.It is adirectimageof thesocialstructure within itscultural andeconomic context. Season-related dailywork routines permeate shape, function and structure of the house and result in an authentic and ecologic house type that is simple yet highlycomplex.
 

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Contents

Typology
8
The principle of combination
18
Floor plan types
20
Single storey Northsouth orientation
22
Single storey Eastwest orientation
24
Single storey Northsouth orientation
26
Single storey Northsouth orientation
28
Garden courtyard house Single storey Northsouth orientation
30
Lshaped house Two storeys Northsouth orientation
67
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
68
Lshaped house Two storeys Northsouth orientation
69
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
70
Lshaped house Two storeys Northsouth orientation
71
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
72
Lshaped house Three storeys Eastwest orientation
73
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
74

Garden courtyard house Single storey Eastwest orientation
31
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
32
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
34
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
36
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
38
Garden courtyard house Two storeys Northsouth orientation
39
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
40
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
42
Garden courtyard house Three storeys Northsouth orientation
43
Three storeys Eastwest orientation
44
Three storeys Northsouth orientation
46
Three storeys Northsouth orientation
48
Three storeys Northsouth orientation
50
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
52
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
54
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
56
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
58
Shared courtyard house Three storeys Northsouth orientation
59
Three storeys Eastwest orientation
60
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
62
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
64
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
66
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
76
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
78
Single storey Northsouth orientation
80
Single storey Northsouth orientation
82
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
84
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
86
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
88
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
90
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
92
Three Storeys Northsouth orientation
94
Three storeys Eastwest orientation
96
Three storeys Northsouth orientation
98
Three storeys Eastwest orientation
100
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
102
Two storeys Northsouth orientation
104
Two storeys Eastwest orientation
106
Atriumtype house Two storeys Northsouth orientation
107
Three storeys Eastwest orientation
108
Bibliography
110
Illustration credits
112
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Günter Pfeifer is a professor of design and residential building at the Technische Universität Darmstadt (Darmstadt University of Technology). As a practicing architect he has worked with Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Tadao Ando, Alvaro Siza, and others. He taught design and building construction for ten years and is active today in the intelligent, energy-saving, sustainable development of existing building types.

Dipl.-Ing. Per Brauneck is a teacher and researcher at the Technische Universität Darmstadt (Darmstadt University of Technology).

Together they have already published the book Exposed Concrete: Technology and Design (Birkhäuser Verlag).

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