Coyote Warrior: One Man, Three Tribes, and the Trial That Forged a Nation

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U of Nebraska Press, Nov 1, 2005 - History - 321 pages
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From White Shield to Washington DC, new Indian wars are being fought by Ivy League?trained lawyers called Coyote Warriors?among them a Mandan/Hidatsa named Raymond Cross. Coyote Warrior tells the epic story of the three tribes that saved Lewis and Clark?s Corps of Discovery from starvation, those tribes' century-long battle to forge a new nation, and the extraordinary journey of one man to redeem a father?s dream and the dignity of his people.
°Cross graduated from law school and, following his father?s death, returned home to resurrect his father?s fight against the federal government. His mission would lead him to Congress, which his father had battled forty years earlier, and into the hallowed chambers of the U.S. Supreme Court. There the great-great-grandson of Chief Cherry Necklace would lay at the feet of the nation?s highest court the case for the sanctity of the United States Constitution, treaty rights, and the legal survival of Indian Country.
 

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Coyote warrior: one man, three tribes, and the trial that forged a nation

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Coyote warriors are Native American leaders who use science, law, and tribal sovereignty to protect their heritage (including their culture and natural resources) against self-serving tribal ... Read full review

Contents

INTRODUCTION
3
1i SAVAGES AND INFIDELS
35
HI MIRACLE AT HORSE CREEK
57
1v GREAT WHITE FATHERS
79
HELL AND HIGH WATER
107
v1 LEAVING ELBOWOODS
139
v11 HITTING BOTTOM ON TOP
163
v1n RETURN OF THE NATIVES 183
201
INTO THE STORM
225
APPENDICES
249
1851 TREATY OF FORT LARAMIE HORSE CREEK
263
NOTES
267
BIBLIOGRAPHY
295
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
311
INDEX
313
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Paul VanDevelder has been an investigative reporter, photojournalist, and documentary filmmaker for more than twenty years. His award-winning work has appeared in The New York Times, National Geographic Traveler, Audubon, Esquire, and the Seattle Times.

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