Crabgrass Frontier: The Suburbanization of the United States

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Oxford University Press, Apr 16, 1987 - History - 432 pages
2 Reviews
This first full-scale history of the development of the American suburb examines how "the good life" in America came to be equated with the a home of one's own surrounded by a grassy yard and located far from the urban workplace. Integrating social history with economic and architectural analysis, and taking into account such factors as the availability of cheap land, inexpensive building methods, and rapid transportation, Kenneth Jackson chronicles the phenomenal growth of the American suburb from the middle of the 19th century to the present day. He treats communities in every section of the U.S. and compares American residential patterns with those of Japan and Europe. In conclusion, Jackson offers a controversial prediction: that the future of residential deconcentration will be very different from its past in both the U.S. and Europe.
 

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User Review  - Scapegoats - LibraryThing

Jackson provides a comprehensive analysis of the the move to the suburbs in America. He argues that this is not a new phenomena, but goes back to the nineteenth century. He cites the causes as the ... Read full review

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User Review  - rivkat - LibraryThing

Why does the US look so strange compared to other places with big cities, with failing urban cores surrounded by prosperous (ticklike, even) suburbs? Jackson gives the history of US suburbanization ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
3
1 Suburbs As Slums
12
2 The Transportation Revolution and the Erosion of the Walking City
20
The House and the Yard
45
4 Romantic Suburbs
73
Elite Suburbs and Commuter Railroads
87
6 The Time of the Trolley
103
7 Affordable Homes for the Common Man
116
How Washington Changed the American Housing Market
190
The Ghettoization of Public Housing in the United States
219
13 The Baby Boom and the Age of the Subdivision
231
14 The Drivein Culture of Contemporary America
246
15 The Loss of Community in Metropolitan America
272
16 Retrospect and Prospect
283
Appendix
307
Notes
329

The Rise and Fall of Municipal Annexation
138
9 The New Age of Automobility
157
10 Suburban Development Between the Wars
172

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About the author (1987)

Kenneth T. Jackson, Professor of History at Columbia University, is the author of The Ku Klux Klan in the City, 1915-1930; Cities in American History; and a number of other books.

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