Craft and Contemporary Theory

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Sue Rowley
Allen & Unwin, 1997 - Art - 198 pages
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What is the relationship between art, craft and design? Where does craft sit in the museum?
This innovative interdisciplinary collection explores cultural perceptions of craft and their impact on contemporary practice.
 

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Contents

new tricks of the trades
3
Craft modernity and postmodernity
18
craft and design in museum history
29
audience space
43
craft history and curatorship
53
Words of lovefolk heterotopias
65
craft and narrative
76
thinking about
85
The floating web
98
Imants Tillers and the suspension
112
the representation of craft
123
performance New York 1994
138
Yolngu and Ngarrindjeri weaving in Australian
155
Notes 111
171
Bibliography
187
Copyright

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Page 103 - Mrs. Ramsay, who had been sitting loosely, folding her son in her arms, braced herself, and, half-turning, seemed to raise herself with an effort, and at once to pour erect into the air a rain of energy, a column of spray, looking at the same time animated and alive as if all her energies were being fused into force, burning and illuminating . . . and into this delicious fecundity, this fountain and spray of life, the fatal sterility of the male plunged itself, like a beak of brass, barren and bare.
Page 103 - ... to pour erect into the air a rain of energy, a column of spray, looking at the same time animated and alive as if all her energies were being fused into force, burning and illuminating (quietly though she sat, taking up her stocking again), and into this delicious fecundity, this fountain and spray of life, the fatal sterility of the male plunged itself, like a beak of brass, barren and bare.
Page 98 - My dear, I beg you not to be too much distressed. No one is going to send me down to Hades before my proper time. But Fate is a thing that no man born of woman, coward or hero, can escape. Go home now, and attend to your own work, the loom and the spindle, and see that the maidservants go on with theirs. War is men's business; and this war is the business of every man in Ilium, myself above all.
Page 76 - And nothing would be more fatuous than to want to see in it merely a "symptom of decay," let alone a "modern" symptom. It is, rather, only a concomitant symptom of the secular productive forces of history, a concomitant that has quite gradually removed narrative from the realm of living speech and at the same time is making it possible to see a new beauty in what is vanishing.
Page 104 - I discovered that the house itself was full of likenesses, of replicas, prints of paintings, prints of prints, genuine originals and genuine imitation originals, imitation sculptures and twin original sculptures, (p.
Page 46 - In all these respects art, considered in its highest vocation, is and remains for us a thing of the past. Thereby it has lost for us genuine truth and life, and has rather been transferred into our ideas instead of maintaining its earlier necessity in reality and occupying its higher place.
Page 143 - York of the commuter — the city that is devoured by locusts each day and spat out each night. Third, there is the New York of the person who was born somewhere else and came to New York in quest of something.
Page 147 - You are made fully aware of it before you have travelled the length of a single block in any of these East Side streets, by the whir of a thousand sewing-machines, worked at high pressure from earliest dawn till mind and muscle give out together. Every member of the family, from the youngest to the oldest, bears a hand, shut in the qualmy rooms, where meals are cooked and clothing washed and dried besides, the live-long day.
Page 81 - It sinks the thing into the life of the storyteller, in order to bring it out of him again. Thus traces of the storyteller cling to the story the way the handprints of the potter cling to the clay vessel.
Page 150 - Like in the United Colors of Benetton ads, a Utopian discourse of sameness helps to erase all unpleasant stories. The message is a refried colonial idea: If we merely hold hands and dance mambo together, we can effectively abolish ideology, sexual and cultural politics and class differences.

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About the author (1997)

Sue Rowley holds the Foundation Chair of Contemporary Australian Art History at the University of NSW College of Fine Arts and is President of the Centre for Contemporary Craft.

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