Creating Cyber Libraries: An Instructional Guide for School Library Media Specialists

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Libraries Unlimited, 2002 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 222 pages
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As prices of traditional library materials increase, and space to house them shrinks, savvy school library media specialists are creating cyber libraries, or school libraries on the Internet. These libraries offer students and their parents 24-hour access and are invaluable for providing up-to-date information in a way traditional materials cannot. This guide outlines the steps library media specialists can take to create a cyber library, provide content and policies for use, and maintain it for maximum efficiency.

Craver justifies the need for cyber libraries in the 21st century, and how they can help librarians to meet the standards in Information Power (1998). She explains the different types of cyber libraries available, along with their advantages and disadvantages. She discusses how to construct them using portals or by acquiring fee-based cyber libraries, and what policies should be in place to protect both the school and its students. Also included are instructions for establishing remote access to subscription databases, creating cyber reading rooms, and providing instructional services to student users. Once a cyber library is created, it must be maintained and evaluated to keep it useful and current, and this book provides guidelines to do so. Finally, there is a chapter on promoting the cyber library, so the school community is aware of its features and participates in its growth process. No school library should be without this volume!

 

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Contents

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Copyright

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Page xiv - SLMSs, a cyber library can be as simple as a "home page linked to a collection of electronic texts, databases, and other existing Internet resources" (Garlock and Pointek 1996, 9).
Page ii - Kathleen W. Craver. Using Internet Primary Sources to Teach Critical Thinking Skills in Mathematics.

About the author (2002)

KATHLEEN W. CRAVER is Head Librarian at the National Cathedral School in Washington, D.C. She is the author of School Library Media Centers in the 21st Century (Greenwood, 1994), Teaching Electronic Literacy (Greenwood, 1997), and Using Internet Primary Sources to Teach Critical Thinking Skills in History (Greenwood, 1999), which won the 2000 American Association of History and Computing Book Prize.

Bibliographic information