Creating Ikebana

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Japan Publications Trading, 2005 - Crafts & Hobbies - 128 pages
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Ikebana is perhaps the most well-known and actively practiced of all Japan's traditional arts. Its origin dates back over six-centuries and it continues to be a vital art form today. There are numerous schools of ikebana, each with its own set of rules and techniques. One such school is the Ichiyo School. Ichiyo, pronounce ee-chee-yo, meaning "one leaf" in Japanese, refers to the logo of the school. The School was founded in 1937 by a brother and sister, Meikof and Ichiyo Kasuya, who sought to create original ikebana that would be more suitable for modern lifestyles and environments.

Today the Ichiyo School instructs students worldwide and in 1996 the School founded centers for instruction both in Europe and the United States. They focus on two types of flower arrangement: one to fit diversified personal surroundings, from traditional Japanese tokonoma, or alcoves, to Western entry tables, and another for public spaces, from stage settings to hotel lobbies.

Akihiro Kasuya is the third son of Meikof Kasuya and became the school's third Iemoto (Headmaster) in 1983. CREATING IKEBANA beautifully illustrates some of Kasuya's most extraordinary creations, such as large displays featuring the school's tradition of the flowing and crossing forms, the use of color and emptiness, and the balance of asymmetry.

Beautifully illustrated and with an introductory overview by the author, CREATING IKEBANA is sure to interest anyone interested in the fine art of flower arrangement.
 

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Contents

Glass Containers
25
Bamboo
47
In Various Containers
67
Ikebana in Daily Life
97
Ikebana on Exhibition 707
128
Copyright

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About the author (2005)


AKIHIRO KASUYA has been among the most active and creative of the young generations of Ikebana artists. He is currently a director of two prestigious ikebana artists' groups, The Japan Ikebana Art Association and the Ikebana Association. He is the advisor to Ikebana International and a director of Teikoku Kadoin, an ikebana academy.

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