Creating Policies for Results: From Chaos to Clarity

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American Library Association, 2003 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 232 pages
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What does a librarian do if an unattended child remains at closing time? Can nonresidents get a library card? What is the library's position on Internet filters? These are but a few of the kinds of issues that require clear, up-to-date library policies. If your staff makes decisions on the fly, if policies are nonexistent, outdated, and no one knows what they are, your library may be experiencing policy chaos. To avoid potential legal liabilities, confusion, lost opportunities and tensions among management, employees, customers, and the community at large, the answer is to create current, customized policies geared to your library. Now it's easier than ever using this one-stop, step-by-step guide that dovetails with PLA's The New Planning for Results. Covering governance and organizational structure, management policies, and services relating to customers, circulation, information, and groups, this comprehensive how-to addresses each major library area. Follow these guidelines to assess existing policies, develop new ones, and communicate all changes to improve consistency. You will learn to: Create sound and legally defensible policies; Customize policies appropriate to your libra
 

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Contents

Issues
1
Definitions
3
Practice and Policy
6
Functions of Library Policies
7
Legal Support
13
Challenges
14
Key Points to Remember
21
Inventory
22
DISTRIBUTION OF NONLIBRARY MATERIALS
151
STAFF COMMITTEES AND STAFF TASK FORCES
153
INCLEMENT WEATHER AND CLOSING
154
CUSTOMER SERVICE
156
CUSTOMER BEHAVIOR
158
UNATTENDED CHILDREN
159
LIBRARY CARDS FOR RESIDENTS
160
LIBRARY CARDS FOR NONRESIDENTS
162

Definitions
24
Purpose of a Policy Audit
25
Policy Audit Inventory
30
Challenges
42
Key Points to Remember
45
Assessment
46
Definitions
47
Policy Audit Assessment
48
Challenges
67
Key Points to Remember
69
Development
71
Definitions
73
Policy Development
74
Challenges
102
Key Points to Remember
104
Implementation
105
Definitions
108
Challenges
128
Key Points to Remember
130
Policy Development Templates
133
STAFF ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES
135
CONFIDENTIALITY OF LIBRARY RECORDS
136
STATISTICS
137
PETTY CASH
139
FUNDRAISING AND DONATIONS
140
RECONSIDERATION OF LIBRARY MATERIALS
142
BUILDING MAINTENANCE
143
EMERGENCIES AND DISASTERS
144
MEETING ROOM USE
145
EXHIBITS AND DISPLAYS
147
BULLETIN BOARDS
149
LOAN PERIODS AND LOAN LIMITS
164
RENEWALS
165
RESERVES
166
CLAIMS RETURNED OR CLAIMS NEVER HAD
168
LOST OR DAMAGED MATERIALS
170
FINES AND FEES
172
BORROWING MATERIALS BY STAFF
175
PRIORITIES FOR REFERENCE SERVICE
176
INTERLIBRARY LOAN
178
INTERNET USE
180
USE OF LIBRARYPROVIDED PERSONAL COMPUTERS
182
PROGRAMS IN THE LIBRARY
184
COSPONSORED PROGRAMS IN THE LIBRARY
186
COMMUNITY PRESENTATIONS
188
SPECIAL EVENTS
190
TOURS
191
COMPUTER TRAINING FOR THE PUBLIC
193
Instructions and Workforms
195
Contents of the Library Policy Manual
196
Other Policy Statements Regulations Procedures and Guidelines
198
Policy Audit Inventory Log
200
Policy Audit Inventory Results
202
Defining Policy Elements
205
Evaluation Criteria
210
Policy Element Review Summary
218
Policy Revision and Development Summary
220
Master Schedule
222
Glossary of Policy Terms
225
Index
229
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Nelson is a consultant and trainer specializing in public library planning management, and staff developement.

June Garcia is managing partner with the library consulting firm Dubberly Garcia, which specializes in planning, facilities, and executive recruiting. The firm's clients include the Baltimore County Public Library, the San Diego Public Library, and the Las Vegas-Clark County Public Library. With more than 30 years of experience in public libraries, she served as director of the San Antonio Public Library and Library Extension Services Administrator at the Phoenix Public Library. She was also Chief Executive Officer of the CARL Corporation, a major library automation company. Active in the Public Library Association, she is an award-winning librarian and was on PLA's planning committees to create Managing for Results and Staffing for Results.

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