Creative Space: Models of Creative Processes for the Knowledge Civilization Age

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Springer Science & Business Media, Dec 2, 2005 - Mathematics - 288 pages
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Creative Space summarizes and integrates the various up-to-date approaches of computational intelligence to knowledge and technology creation including the specific novel feature of utilizing the creative abilities of the human mind, such as tacit knowledge, emotions and instincts, and intuition. It analyzes several important approaches of this new paradigm such as the Shinayakana Systems Approach, the organizational knowledge creation theory, in particular SECI Spiral, and the Rational Theory of Intuition – resulting in the concept of Creative Space. This monograph presents and analyzes in detail this new concept together with its ontology – the list and meanings of the analyzed nodes of this space and of the character of transitions linking these nodes.

 

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This is a delightful treatment of preverbal creativity. A knowledge civilization is expected to exist through 2100. Philosophy will be emergent. A new informed systems approach, beyond games of words, and involving social interactivity so it is not completely automated, will help solve the pressing and future issues and paradoxes. In the midst of computerized creative environments, a topic outside the scope of the book, there is a concept of a space comprised of about 3.5 billion transitions between nodes, each representing a unique concept. A Shinayakana approach, the synthesis of hard and soft systems, and a mix of Oriental and Occidental perspectives, e.g. of wisdom and logic, is applied. The authors hail from Japan and Poland. As far as style, emphasis is provided by italics for phrases or box outlines for paragraphs. Spirals are used to diagram creation processes, akin to circuits or cells, similar to the book The Grammar of Technology Development. There are three for organizational knowledge, three for normal academic knowledge and another for revolutionary scientific. They can be juxtaposed or merged, for example into a triple helix projected which functions as a sort of enlightenment press. All are shown together in a tree of types. There can be a lot more observations after an appropriate gestation period. The reader may wonder, if mind is action as the text extols, if they have also developed a material that can replicate human intuition. 

Contents

1 Preliminaries
1
12 The Problem of Knowledge and Technology Creation Versus the Problem of Their Justification and Verification
2
13 Short Review of the History of Knowledge Justification and Verification Approaches
4
14 New Approaches to the Problem of Knowledge and Technology Creation
9
15 The Challenge of New Informational and Knowledge Civilization Era
12
16 The Need of a New Understanding of the World
15
17 The Challenge to Epistemology
21
18 The Contents of this Book and Related Issues
22
54 Current Perceptions of the Nature of the New Era
137
What Problems of Humanity Should We Solve?
139
56 Main Megatrends of the New Era
142
57 Impacts of Digital and Network Technology
147
58 Change in Economic Behavior and in Economics
151
59 Change in Social Behavior and in Sociology
152
510 Main Conflicts of the Coming Era
156
511 Main Stages of the Coming Era and Our Essential Obligations
157

Models of Creative Processes
25
2 Rational Theory of Intuition and Its Epistemological Consequences
27
23 The Relative Complexity of Processing Visual and Verbal Information
32
24 The Dual Thought Experiment
34
25 First Validation Tests of the Rational Theory of Intuition
37
27 The Role of Language and Tradition in the Evolution of Human Civilization
40
28 The Limitations of Language
42
29 The Civilization Heritage of Humanity and Its Constitutive Parts
43
210 Ontological and Epistemological Consequences
46
211 The Problem of Truth and Objectivity
48
212 The Problem of Creativity
51
213 Intuitive Decisions
53
214 Creative Intuitive Processes
55
215 Relations to Far East Philosophy and to Psychology of Subconscious and Unconscious
56
216 Practical Aspects of Intuition
57
3 Basic Dimensions of Creative Space
59
32 The Concepts of Knowledge and Technology
60
33 SECI Spiral
68
34 The Concept of Creative Space
75
35 Basic Transitions in Creative Space
79
36 New Spirals of Creative Processes
81
37 Conditions for Stimulating Scientific Debate and Final Remarks
87
4 Further Dimensions of Creative Space
91
42 Pentagram System
92
43 Imagination
95
44 Intervention
98
45 Integration
100
46 Pentagram System Shinayakana Systems Approach and Critical Systems Thinking
103
47 Basic versus Applied Research
107
48 Constructivist versus Objectivist View of Reality
109
49 Hermeneutic Reflection and Triple Helix of Normal Knowledge Creation
115
410 CrossCultural and Organizational Knowledge Creation
118
Concluding Remarks
122
Issues in the Knowledge Civilization Age
125
5 A Vision of the New Civilization Era
127
53 Concepts and Ideas Leading to the Cultural Platform of the New Civilization Era
129
6 A New Role of Systems Science Informed Systems Approach
161
62 The Diversity of Systemic Approaches
162
63 Soft Perspective of the History of Systems Science Theorizing Systems Methodologies Across Cultures
170
Soft Versus Hard Systems Thinking
171
Critical Systems ThinkingCritical Systems Practice CSTCSP
173
Unbounded Systems Thinking UST
176
Shinayakana and WSR
180
64 Hard Perspective of the History of Systems Science
185
Computer Science Logic and Computer Intelligence
186
Dynamic Systems Chaos and Complexity Theory
190
Operational Research and Optimization
193
Modeling Computational Science Decision Support ComputerMan Interaction
196
65 Synergy and Emergence
199
66 A New Definition of Systems Science
203
67 Three Principles of Integrated Perspective and Fields of Knowledge Related to the New Paradigm
205
Intercultural Synthesis
210
Informed Creative Systemic Approach
214
Towards Knowledge and Technology Creation Support
217
7 Decision Support versus Knowledge Creation Support
219
72 Decision Automation versus Computerized Decision Support
220
73 The Meaning and History of Decision Support
222
74 Current Status of Decision Support
229
75 The Difference and Similarities Between Decision Support and Creativity Support
234
76 Key Objects for Creativity Support
236
77 The Concept of Creative Environment
243
78 Existing and Needed Creative Environments
244
Web Knowledge Acquisition
245
Debating
246
Virtual Laboratories
247
Brainstorming
248
Distance Learning and Teaching
249
8 Conclusions
251
References
263
Index
281
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