Cricket and England: A Cultural and Social History of the Inter-war Years

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Taylor & Francis, 1999 - Health & Fitness - 217 pages
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In this book Jack Williams takes a look at cricket as a symbol of England in the 1920s and 1930s. Cricket had a vital role in how the English imagined themselves and their social world. Assumptions attached to the high level of sportsmanship within cricket and the associations of cricket with the Church, respect for tradition, the empire, the public schools and reverence for pastoralism meant that cricket was represented as expressing a distinctively English form of moral worth.
 

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Contents

Images of Cricket
1
The Structure and Control of Cricket
20
Interest in Cricket
45
Cricket and Sportsmanship
74
Cricket and Gender
92
Cricket Hierarchy and Class
114
Cricket and Christianity
142
Cricket and Commercialisation
161
Conclusion
183
Bibliography
193
Index
213
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About the author (1999)

Williams is Senior Lecturer in History, Liverpool John Moores University.

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