Cricket and the Law: The Man in White is Always Right

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Psychology Press, 2005 - Law - 438 pages
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Cricket, law and the meaning of life ...

In a readable, informed and absorbing discussion of cricket's defining controversies – bodyline, chucking, ball-tampering, sledging, walking and the use of technology, among many others – David Fraser explores the ambiguities of law and social order in cricket.

Cricket and the Law charts the interrelationship between cricket and legal theory – between the law of the game and the law of our lives – and demonstrates how cricket's cultural conventions can escape the confines of the game to carry far broader social meanings.

This engaging study will be enjoyed by lawyers, students of culture and cricket lovers everywhere.

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The legal theory of cricket
15
Lord Denning cricket law and the meaning of life
21
Dante cricket law and the meaning of life
26
Laws not rules or cricket as adjudication
30
Law codes and the spirit of the game
40
More law and the spirit of the game
52
The man in white is always right umpires judges and the rule of law
69
Bouncers terror and the rule of law in cricket
201
Balltampering and the rule of law
216
The little master balltampering and the rule of law
257
Delay and overrates temporality and the meaning of cricket
267
Ethical discourse legal narrative and the meaning of cricket
276
Yousledging and cricket as ethical discourse
280
Walking the judicial function and the meaning of law
296
Other stories about cricket law and the meaning of life
306

Umpires decisions and the rule of law
84
The man in white is always right but he is not always neutral
107
Technology adjudication and law
112
Leg before wicket causation and the rule of law
125
Mankad Javed Hilditch Sarfraz and the rule of law
133
Its not cricket underarm bowling legality and the meaning of life
148
The chucker as outlaw legality morality and exclusion in cricket
156
Murali Shoaib and the jurisprudence of chucking
164
Capitalism and the meaning of cricket
335
Class struggle old school tie and the meaning of cricket
343
The Hill the members and others the crowd as subtext
347
Bodyline postmodernism law and the meaning of life
357
Conclusion on life law and cricket
363
Notes
365
Index
425
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

David Fraser teaches in the Faculty of Law, the University of Sydney.

Judith Grbich teaches in the School of Law and Legal Studies, La Trobe Univ

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