Crime Fiction

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2005 - Fiction - 170 pages
0 Reviews

Crime Fiction provides a lively introduction to what is both a wide-ranging and hugely popular literary genre. Using examples from a variety of novels, short stories, films and televisions series, John Scaggs:

  • presents a concise history of crime fiction - from biblical narratives to James Ellroy - broadening the genre to include revenge tragedy and the gothic novel
  • explores the key sub-genres of crime fiction, such as 'Rational Criminal Investigation', The Hard-Boiled Mode', 'The Police Procedural' and 'Historical Crime Fiction'
  • locates texts and their recurring themes and motifs in a wider social and historical context
  • outlines the various critical concepts that are central to the study of crime fiction, including gender, narrative theory and film theory
  • considers contemporary television series like C.S.I.: Crime Scene Investigation alongside the 'classic' whodunnits of Agatha Christie.

Accessible and clear, this comprehensive overview is the essential guide for all those studying crime fiction and concludes with a look at future directions for the genre in the twentieth-first century.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

IV
7
V
13
VI
17
VII
26
VIII
33
IX
39
X
43
XI
46
XX
91
XXI
98
XXII
100
XXIII
105
XXIV
108
XXV
117
XXVI
122
XXVII
125

XII
50
XIII
55
XIV
58
XV
64
XVI
70
XVII
77
XVIII
85
XIX
87
XXVIII
135
XXIX
139
XXX
144
XXXI
149
XXXII
151
XXXIII
166
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2005)

John Scaggs is a Lecturer in the Department of English at Mary Immaculate College in Limerick, Ireland. His research interests include Modern Fiction, with a particular emphasis on crime fiction and revenge tragedy, the Gothic and Literary Theory.

Bibliographic information