Crime Reconstruction

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Elsevier, Oct 27, 2006 - Social Science - 616 pages
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Crime Reconstruction is a guide to the interpretation of physical evidence. It was developed to aid forensic reconstructionists with the formulation of hypotheses and conclusions that stay within the known limits of forensic evidence.

The book begins with chapters on the history and ethics of crime reconstruction, and then shifts to the more applied subjects of general reconstruction methods and practice standards. It concludes with chapters on courtroom conduct and evidence admissibility, to prepare forensic reconstructionists for what awaits them when they take the witness stand.

This book is a watershed collaborative effort by internationally known, qualified, and respected forensic science practitioners with generations of case experience. Forensic pioneers such as John D. DeHaan, John I. Thornton, and W. Jerry Chisum contribute chapters on arson reconstruction, trace evidence interpretation, advanced bloodstain interpretation, and reconstructionist ethics.

Other chapters cover the subjects of shooting incident reconstruction, interpreting digital evidence, staged crime scenes, and examiner bias. Rarely have so many forensic giants collaborated, and never before have the natural limits of physical evidence been made so clear.

This book is ideal for forensic examiners, forensic scientists, crime lab personnel, and special victim and criminal investigators. Others who will benefit from this book are law enforcement officials, forensic medical personnel, and criminal lawyers.

* Contains the first practice standards ever published for the reconstruction of crime
* Provides a clear ethical canon for the reconstructionist
* Includes groundbreaking discussions of examiner bias and observer effects as they impact forensic evidence interpretation
* Ideal for applied courses on the subject of crime reconstruction, as well as those teaching crime reconstruction theory within criminology and criminal justice programs
 

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Contents

1 A HISTORY OF CRIME RECONSTRUCTION
1
2 CRIME RECONSTRUCTION ETHOS AND ETHICS
37
PSYCHOLOGICAL INFLUENCES ON THE FORENSIC EXAMINER
51
4 PRACTICE STANDARDS FOR THE RECONSTRUCTION OF CRIME
85
5 METHODS OF CRIME RECONSTRUCTION
127
6 EVIDENCE DYNAMICS
161
7 TRACE EVIDENCE IN CRIME RECONSTRUCTION
197
8 SHOOTING INCIDENT RECONSTRUCTION
215
10 FIRE SCENE RECONSTRUCTION
361
11 RECONSTRUCTING DIGITAL EVIDENCE
419
12 STAGED CRIME SCENES
441
13 SURVIVING AND THRIVING IN THE COURTROOM
483
14 RECONSTRUCTIONISTS IN A POSTDAUBERT AND POSTDNA COURTROOM
507
INDEX
573
COLOR PLATES
589
Copyright

9 RECONSTRUCTION USING BLOODSTAIN EVIDENCE
313

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Page 10 - Detection is, or ought to be, an exact science and should be treated in the same cold and unemotional manner. You have attempted to tinge it with romanticism, which produces much the same effect as if you worked a love-story or an elopement into the fifth proposition of Euclid.
Page 9 - Let him, on meeting a fellow-mortal, learn at a glance to distinguish the history of the man, and the trade or profession to which he belongs. Puerile as such an exercise may seem, it sharpens the faculties of observation and teaches one where to look and what to look for. By a man's fingernails, by his coat-sleeve, by his boot, by his trouserknees, by the callosities of his forefinger and thumb, by his expression, by his shirt-cuffs — by each of these things a man's calling is plainly revealed....
Page 29 - ... these and more bear mute witness against him. This is evidence that does not forget. It is not confused by the excitement of the moment. It is not absent because human witnesses are. It is factual evidence. Physical evidence cannot be wrong; it cannot perjure itself; it cannot be wholly absent. Only its interpretation can err. Only human failure to find it, study and understand it, can diminish its value.
Page x - This thou must always bear in mind, what is the nature of the whole, and what is my nature, and how this is related to that, and what kind of a part it is of what kind of a whole, and that there is no one who hinders thee from always doing and saying the things which are according to the nature of which thou art a part.

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About the author (2006)

William Jerry Chisum has been a criminalist since 1960. He studied under Dr. Paul L. Kirk at U.C. Berkeley, worked in San Bernardino, and set up the Kern County Laboratory in Bakersfield. After joining the California Dept. of Justice, he took a leave of absence (1971-73) to work at Stanford Research Institute. He has been President of the California Association of Criminalists three times, and has also served as President of the American Society of Crime Lab Directors. In October of 1998, he retired from 37 years of public service but continues working as a private consultant. An accomplished teacher and lecturer, he has also been published in many forensic science journals and books.

Brent E. Turvey spent his first years in college on a pre-med track only to change his course of study once his true interests took hold. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Portland State University in Psychology, with an emphasis on Forensic Psychology, and an additional Bachelor of Science degree in History. He went on to receive his Masters of Science in Forensic Science after studying at the University of New Haven, in West Haven, Connecticut.

Since graduating in 1996, Brent has consulted with many agencies, attorneys, and police departments in the United States, Australia, China, Canada, Barbados and Korea on a range of rapes, homicides, and serial/ multiple rape/ death cases, as a forensic scientist and criminal profiler. He has also been court qualified as an expert in the areas of criminal profiling, forensic science, victimology, and crime reconstruction. In August of 2002, he was invited by the Chinese People's Police Security University (CPPSU) in Beijing to lecture before groups of detectives at the Beijing, Wuhan, Hanzou, and Shanghai police bureaus. In 2005, he was invited back to China again, to lecture at the CPPSU, and to the police in Beijing and Xian - after the translation of the 2nd edition of his text into Chinese for the University. In 2007, he was invited to lecture at the 1st Behavioral Sciences Conference at the Home Team (Police) Academy in Singapore, where he also provided training to their Behavioral Science Unit. In 2012 Brent completed his PhD in Criminology from Bond University in Gold Coast, Australia.

He is the author of Criminal Profiling: An Introduction to Behavioral Evidence Analysis, 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Editions (1999, 2002, 2008, 2011); co- author of the Rape Investigation Handbook, 1st and 2nd Editions (2004, 2011), Crime Reconstruction 1st and 2nd Editions (2006, 2011), Forensic Victimology (2008) and Forensic Fraud (2013) - all with Elsevier Science. He is currently a full partner, Forensic Scientist, Criminal Profiler, and Instructor with Forensic Solutions, LLC, and an Adjunct Professor of Justice Studies at Oklahoma City University. He can be contacted via email at: bturvey@forensic-science.com.

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