Criminal Victimization In The U.s.: 1973-90 Trends

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DIANE Publishing, 1993 - Law - 136 pages
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Shows trends in victimization rates for selected major crimes based on demographic characteristics of the victims & trends in victimizations that were reported to the police. It focuses on certain personal & household crimes, whether completed or attempted.
 

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Page 136 - ... services. Unlawful entry — A form of burglary committed by someone having no legal right to be on the premises even though force is not used. Victim — The recipient of a criminal act; usually used in relation to personal crimes, but also applicable to households and commercial establishments.
Page 131 - Thus, it measures the precision with which an estimate from a particular sample approximates the average result of all possible samples. The sample estimate and...
Page 136 - Any or all of the states of Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia shall be eligible to become party to this compact.
Page 134 - Marital status-Every person is assigned to one of the following classifications: (1) married, which includes persons in common-law unions and those who are currently living apart for reasons other than marital discord (employment, military service, etc.); (2) separated or divorced, which includes married persons who are legally separated and those who are not living together because of marital discord; (3) widowed; and (4) never married, which includes persons whose marriages have been annulled and...
Page 136 - A crime as it affects one individual person or household. For personal crimes, the number of victimizations is equal to the number of victims involved. The number of victimizations may be greater than the number of incidents because more than one person may be victimized during an incident. Each crime against a household is assumed to involve a single victim, the affected household. Victimization rate— A measure of the occurrence of victimizations among a specified population group. For personal...
Page 134 - Assault — An unlawful physical attack, whether aggravated or simple, upon a person. Includes attempted assaults with or without a weapon. Excludes rape and attempted rape, as well as attacks involving theft or attempted theft, which are classified as robbery. Attempted forcible entry — A form of burglary in which force is used in an attempt to gain entry. Burglary — Unlawful or forcible entry of a residence or business, usually, but not necessarily, attended by theft. Includes attempted forcible...
Page 130 - In order to conduct field interviews, the sample was divided into six groups, or rotations, each of which contained housing units whose occupants were to be interviewed once every 6 months over a period of 3 years. The initial interview...
Page 136 - ... resulting in injury. An injury is classified as resulting from a serious assault if a weapon was used in the commission of the crime or, if not, when the extent of the injury was either serious (eg, broken bones, loss of teeth, internal injuries, loss of consciousness) or undetermined but requiring 2 or more days of hospitalization.
Page 136 - Robbery— Theft or attempted theft, directly from a person, of property or cash by force or threat of force, with or without a weapon.
Page 136 - An injury is classified as resulting from a serious assault, irrespective of the extent of injury, if a weapon was used in the commission of the crime or, if not, when the extent of the injury was either serious (eg, broken bones, loss of teeth, internal injuries, loss of •consciousness) or undetermined but requiring 2 or more days of hospitalization.

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