Criminal Behavior: Theories, Typologies and Criminal Justice

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SAGE, Mar 13, 2008 - Social Science - 605 pages
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Rich in historical and contemporary theory and research, Criminal Behavior: Theories, Typologies, and Criminal Justice is a comprehensive core text that provides an interdisciplinary overview of criminal behavior by examining relevant crime theories, explanations of how and why crime typologies are developed, literature reviews for major crime categories, and discussions of how crime theories and crime typologies are used throughout the criminal justice process. Focusing on relevant themes and current issues, this text also looks closely at categorizations of criminal behavior, the relationship between crime and pop culture, mass media, and computer technology, and gender issues and crime. This engaging book applies theory and research to real-world criminal justice practice.

Key Features and Benefits:

  • Applies theory and research to concrete examples of criminal justice practice in law enforcement, public safety, courts/law, and corrections
  • Explores real-world examples and contemporary issues–using chapter-opening vignettes, illustrative photos and graphs, boxed real-life case studies, and an interdisciplinary framework—making the text lively and engaging
  • Views crime as a dynamic, changing phenomenon and examines how mass media and computer technology shape criminal behavior in a unique chapter on crime, media, and technology that addresses cybercrime and copy cat crimes—topics that fascinate students
  • Examines feminist issues and cultural criminology, reviewing the role of gender and culture in shaping criminal behavior
  • Boasts full chapters on political crime and economic crime—subjects often ignored in other texts Includes comparative information throughout, giving students an international perspective, as well as topical coverage relating to race, ethnicity, and gender issues

Ancillaries

  • A Student study site at www.sagepub.com/helfgottstudy includes self-quizzes, e-flashcards, NPR and Frontline audio and video clips, SAGE Journal articles, and more.
  • Instructor Resources on CD include test questions, PowerPoint slides, and in-class exercises.

Contact Customer Care at 1.800.818.7243 to request a copy.


Intended Audience
This core text offers contemporary insight on criminal behavior for undergraduate and graduate students in criminology and criminal justice, psychology, and related fields.

 

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Contents

Criminal Behavior Nature Extent and Measurement
2
Why Do People Commit Crime?
8
Extent and Measurement of Crime
12
The Dark Figure of Crime
13
Measuring Crime
15
Crime in the United States
25
The Changing Nature of Crime in the 21st Century
31
Summary
41
Sex Crimes
198
Sex Offender Typologies
206
General Categories of Sex Crimes
207
Sex Offending and Gender
224
The Development of Sex Offending Behavior
231
Summary
236
Discussion Questions
237
Web Exercises
238

Discussion Questions
42
Theories of Criminal Behavior
44
Interdisciplinary Criminology
47
Integrating Theories of Criminal Behavior
49
Biological TheoriesWhat Are the Biological Roots of Criminal Behavior?
50
Evolution and Genetics
51
Brain Chemistry and Function
53
Hormones
59
Psychophysiology and Other Biological Factors
60
Psychological TheoriesWhat Psychological Factors Contributed to This Behavior?
61
Cognitive Theories
65
Behavioral Theories
67
Sociological TheoriesWhat Sociological Forces Contributed to This Behavior?
69
Structural
70
Cultural
72
Interactionist
73
Routine ActivityOpportunity TheoriesWhat Situational Contextual Environmental Factors Provided the Setting and Opportunity for This Crime to Oc...
74
CulturalWhat Cultural Forces Provided the Context in Which This Crime Could Occur?
75
PhenomenologicalWhat Personal Meaning Does the Crime Hold for the Offender?
80
Analysis of the BaranyiAnderson Case
83
Alex Baranyi and David Anderson
86
Summary
89
Discussion Questions
90
Typologies of Crime and Mental Disorders
91
What Is a Typology?
92
Mental Disorders and Criminal Behavior
95
The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
96
The Relationship Between Mental Disorder and Crime
98
Theory and Purpose
99
Examples of Different Types of Typologies
101
How Are Criminal Typologies Constructed?
107
An Example
110
Evaluating Typologies
112
ExhaustivenessExclusiveness
115
SimplicityComplexity
116
Summary
117
Discussion Questions
118
Psychopathy and Criminal Behavior
119
Defining Psychopathy
121
Psychopathy as a Categorical or Dimensional Construct
122
Psychopathy and Antisocial Personality Disorder
124
The Psychopaths Inability to Feel
126
What Causes Psychopathy?
127
Biological Predisposition
128
Environmental and Cultural Influences
129
Cognition and Behavior
130
Primary and Secondary Psychopathy
132
Sociocultural Influences on Manifestations of Psychopathy
133
Psychopathy and Gender
135
Social Class and RaceEthnicity
137
The Levels Hypothesis
138
Psychopathy Crime and Criminal Justice Policy and Practice
139
Summary
141
Discussion Questions
142
Criminal Typologies
145
Violent Crime
146
Aggression and Violence
149
Predatory and Affective
150
Gender Aggression and Violence
160
Types of Violent Crime
164
Assault
166
Homicide
172
Robbery
182
Summary
188
Discussion Questions
189
Web Exercises
190
Sex Crime
191
Normal Sexuality Sexual Deviance Sexual Disorder and Sex Crime
192
Normal Sexuality
193
Sexual Deviance
194
Sexual Disorders
195
Economic Crime
239
What Is Economic Crime?
241
Economic Crime Typologies
243
Predatory Offenses
247
MarketBased Offenses
264
Commercial Offenses
273
Is There an Underlying Theoretical Explanation for Economic Crime?
279
Is Economic Crime a Meaningful Crime Category?
281
Summary
282
Web Exercises
283
Public Order Crime
284
The Nature of Public Order Offenses
287
Public Order Crime Typologies
288
Prostitution Commercialized Vice and Pornography
289
Substance AbuseRelated Offenses and Addiction
304
Disorderly Conduct Vagrancy Loitering and Other Violations
317
Is There an Underlying Theoretical Explanation for Public Order Crime?
318
Summary
320
Discussion Questions
321
Political Crime
323
Defining Political Crime
324
Types of Political Crime
331
State Crime
355
The Nature and Dynamics of Political Crime
364
Summary
365
Web Exercises
366
The Influence of Technology Media and Popular Culture on Criminal Behavior Copycat Crime and Cybercrime
367
TechnologyRelated Risk Factors for Criminal Behavior
371
The Criminogenic Effects of Mass Culture and Media Violence
372
The Criminogenic Effects of Computer Technology
376
TechnologyRelated Crime Subtypes
377
Cybercrime
401
Crimes of the FutureHow Technology Shapes Criminal Behavior
410
Summary
412
Discussion Questions
414
Applying Theories and Typologies to Criminal Justice Policy and Practice
417
Applied Criminology How Theories and Typologies Are Used in the Criminal Justice System
418
Police and Public Safety
420
Criminal Profiling
421
Crime Prevention Public Safety and Victim Services
426
The Courts
430
Habitual Offender and Sexual Predator Laws
438
Predicting Dangerousness and Violent Risk Assessment
460
Risk Assessment Instruments
462
Issues in Violence Risk Assessment
472
Drugs Mental Health DUIs
475
Corrections
477
Community Supervision and Offender Reentry
482
Summary
483
Discussion Questions
484
Web Exercises
485
Challenges for the Future
487
The Science of Criminal Behavior
490
Remembering the Past to Inform the Future
493
Challenges and Innovative Directions for the Study of Criminal Behavior
498
Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Theory Integration
500
Technology
501
Imbedded Stereotypes
502
Methodological Creativity
504
Concluding Comments
506
Summary
508
Discussion Questions
509
Web Exercises
510
Notes
511
Glossary
527
References
548
Author Index
581
Subject Index
591
About the Author
605
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Jacqueline (Jackie) Helfgott is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice at Seattle University, where she has taught since 1993. She received her B.A.from the University of Washington in Psychology/Society & Justice and Masters and Ph.D. from The Pennsylvania State University in Administration of Justice with a graduate minor in Psychology. Her work has been published in major journals including Criminal Justice and Behavior, Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice, Journal of Contemporary Criminal Justice, The Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, Federal Probation, The International Review of Victimology, and others. Her research has focused in two general directions – the intersection of psychology, criminology, and criminal justice and institutional and community corrections. Specific research foci and areas of expertise include: psychopathy - its role in the criminal justice system and the prediction of violent recidivism and dangerousness; criminal behavior and the use of crime typologies at different stages of the criminal justice process; offender reentry; correctional program evaluation; and restorative justice - balancing victim, offender, and citizen needs, rights, and interests.

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