Criminal Incapacitation

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Springer Science & Business Media, Nov 30, 1993 - Social Science - 338 pages
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There is nothing uglier than a catfish. With its scaleless, eel-like body, flat, semicircular head, and cartilaginous whiskers, it looks almost entirely unlike a cat. The toothless, sluggish beasts can be found on the bottom of warm streams and lakes, living on scum and detritus. Such a diet is healthier than it sounds: divers in the Ohio River regularly report sighting catfish the size of small whales, and cats in the Mekong River in Southeast Asia often weigh nearly 700 pounds. Ugly or not, the catfish is good to eat. Deep-fried catfish is a Southern staple; more ambitious recipes add Parmesan cheese, bacon drippings and papri ka, or Amontillado. Catfish is also good for you. One pound of channel catfish provides nearly all the protein but only half the calories and fat of 1 pound of solid white albacore tuna. Catfish is a particularly good source of alpha tocopherol and B vitamins. Because they are both nutritious and tasty, cats are America's biggest aquaculture product.
 

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Contents

I
1
II
2
III
10
IV
12
V
21
VI
22
VII
42
VIII
55
XX
197
XXI
198
XXII
211
XXIII
215
XXIV
216
XXV
229
XXVI
230
XXVII
248

IX
56
X
69
XI
79
XII
100
XIII
109
XIV
125
XV
126
XVI
129
XVII
141
XVIII
167
XIX
172
XXIX
265
XXX
286
XXXI
289
XXXII
290
XXXIII
292
XXXIV
304
XXXV
311
XXXVI
313
XXXVII
325
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