Criminological Theory: An Analysis of Its Underlying Assumptions

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2006 - Social Science - 427 pages
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Criminological Theory is an examination of the major theoretical perspectives in criminology today. Werner J. Einstadter and Stuart Henry lay bare various theorists' ideas about human nature, social structure, social order, concepts of law, crime and criminals, the logic of crime causation, and the policies and practices that follow from these premises. Material is presented and organized around these analytic and critical dimensions throughout the text. Criminological Theory provides students with a clear overview of the subject that enables informed comparisons among diverse concepts. Abstract concepts are explained clearly to maximize the significance of each theoretical framework. The authors cover the major literature in an engaging, comprehensive, and accessible way, allowing students to develop a critical understanding of foundational and contemporary ideas in Criminology.
 

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Contents

Introduction to the Analytical Framework
1
Analytical Dimensions and Core Questions
4
Human Nature and Human Behavior
7
Society and Social Order
8
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
12
Causal Logic
14
Criminal Justice Implications
20
Evaluation of the Theories
27
Evaluation
174
Social Process Theories I Learning Bonding and Social Control
181
Basic Idea Central Motif and Methods of the Major Theorists
182
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
185
View of Society and the Social Order
187
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
188
Causal Logic
190
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
196

Demonological Theories Pagan and Theological Ideas about Crime
31
Basic Idea Central Motif and Methods of the Major Theorists
32
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
34
View of Society and the Social Order
35
Causal Logic
37
Criminal Justice System Implications
38
Criminal Justice Policy and Correctional Ideology
40
Techniques of Crime Control
41
Evaluation
43
Classical and Postclassical Rational Choice Theories
47
Basic Idea Central Motif and Methods of the Major Theorists
48
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
50
View of Society and the Social Order
53
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
54
Causal Logic
56
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
58
Criminal Justice Policy and Correctional Ideology
61
Techniques of Crime Control
66
Evaluation
68
Individual Positivism I Biological Theories
75
Basic Idea Central Motif and Methods of the Major Theorists
76
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
79
View of Society and the Social Order
83
Causal Logic
86
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
90
Criminal Justice Policy and Correctional Ideology
91
Techniques of Crime Control
93
Evaluation
95
Individual Positivism II Personality Theories
103
Basic Idea Central Motif and Methods of the Major Theorists
104
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
106
View of Society and the Social Order
111
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
112
On Crime and Criminals
113
Causal Logic
115
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
118
Criminal Justice Policy and Correctional Ideology
119
Techniques of Crime Control
120
Evaluation
121
Sociological Positivism I Social Ecology Theories
127
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
131
View of Society and the Social Order
132
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
133
Causal Logic
135
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
142
Techniques of Crime Control
143
Evaluation
144
Sociological Positivism II Strain and Subcultural Theories
151
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
154
View of Society and the Social Order
156
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
159
Causal Logic
161
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
172
Techniques of Crime Control
173
Criminal Justice Policy and Correctional Ideology
197
Techniques of Crime Control
198
Evaluation
200
Social Process Theories II Interactionism Labeling and Social Constructionism
205
Basic Idea Central Motif and Methods of the Major Theorists
207
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
211
View of Society and the Social Order
215
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
217
Social Constructionist Perspectives on Crime and Deviance as Moral Panic
220
Causal Logic
222
The Reactive Audience
223
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
228
Criminal Justice Policy and Correctional Ideology
229
Evaluation
232
Critical Criminologies I Conflict Anarchist and Marxist Theories
235
Basic Idea Central Motif and Methods of the Major Theorists
236
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
241
View of Society and the Social Order
244
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
247
Causal Logic
251
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
254
Techniques of Crime Control
255
Evaluation
256
Critical Criminologies II Feminist Theories
263
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
269
View of Society and the Social Order
271
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
273
Causal Logic
275
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
277
Evaluation
278
Critical Criminologies III Postmodernist Theories
283
Basic Idea Central Motif and Methods of the Major Theorists
287
Humans Humans Nature and Human Behavior
290
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
293
Causal Logic
296
Criminal Justice Systems Implications
299
Evaluation
303
Integrated Theorizing Fission or Fusion?
309
Overview of Theoretical Integration
310
Integrational Derivation
311
Examples of Integrative Criminology
321
New Directions in Integration
328
Evaluation
329
Conclusion
333
Human Nature society and the Social Order
334
Role of Law Definition of Crime and Image of the Criminal
335
Causal Logic
336
Criminal Justice and Policy Implications
337
Concluding Thoughts
342
References
343
Permissions
407
Index
411
About the Authors
427
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

Werner J. Einstadter is professor emeritus of criminology and sociology at Eastern Michigan University. He has published works on robbery, critical theory, privacy and corrections. Prior to his academic career, Dr. Einstadter held a number of positions in correctional settings. Stuart Henry is a professor of criminology and Director of the School of Public Administration and Urban Studies at San Diego State University. Previously he was Chair of Interdisciplinary Studies at Wayne State University. His twenty two books include, Constitutive Criminology (with Dragan Milovanovic), and (with Mark Lanier) What is Crime? (2001), Essential Criminology(2004), andThe Essential Criminology Reader. He serves on the editorial boards ofTheoretical Criminology andCritical Criminology and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Association of Integrative Studies

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