Crisis & Renewal: Meeting the Challenge of Organizational Change

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Harvard Business School Press, 1995 - Business & Economics - 229 pages
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Crisis & Renewal presents a radical view of how successful organizations evolve and renew themselves and what managers must do to lead the revival. Contrary to traditional organizational theory, which emphasizes rationality and control in the management of change, this book argues that there are times when managers must deliberately create crises by committing acts of "ethical anarchy" in order to break the constraints of success and renew their organizations. Hurst develops a model of change - the organizational ecocycle - to explain how even successful organizations become systematically vulnerable to catastrophe. He brings the model to life with stories of crisis and renewal from both his own management and consulting experiences and a cross-section of enterprises - from the hunter-gatherers of the Kalahari and the Quakers of the Industrial Revolution to contemporary organizations such as 3M and Nike.

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Crisis & renewal: meeting the challenge of organizational change

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Management consultant Hurst examines social organization from the Bushmen of southern Africa to the Nike Corporation and concludes that it is only through a process of renewal following a crisis that ... Read full review

Contents

Acknowledgmenta
1
Developing a ValuesBased Rationality for Change
7
Chaptori Tho Wladoln of tho lluntora
13
Learning and Performance
32
Iexea and Iuhhlea
53
llulttera ef the Splrlt 14
73
Growth and Renewal
96
Crlsls Creatlelt
123
Ithlcal Anarchy
144
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

David K. Hurst is a speaker, consultant, and writer on management, with extensive experience both as an effective manager and educator. He has been a sole practitioner since 1992, and has worked with numerous educational institutions, most recently with the Center for Creative Leadership in Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Richard Ivey School of Business in London, Ontario. He is currently a Research Fellow at the University of Western Ontario's National Centre for Management Research and Development. Hurst was born in England but grew up in South Africa. He now lives with his wife and family in Oakville, Ontario. He has played golf since the age of twelve.

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