Critical Social Theory in Public Administration

Front Cover
M.E. Sharpe, Sep 27, 2004 - Medical - 176 pages
0 Reviews
The essential premise of critical social theory is that contemporary society is neither democratic nor free, but that modern global capitalism creates a citizenry satiated with consumer goods, unaware of alternative ways of living. In the public sector, critical theory suggests that governing systems are influenced, if not controlled, by the wealthy and powerful, leaving public professionals to decide whether to serve those interests or the interests of a broader public. This book provides a framework for the application of critical social theory in public administration. Its goal is to encourage awareness among public administration scholars and practitioners of social conditions that tend to shape and constrain scholarship, practice, teaching, and social change. At a time when concern for public interest and a civil society have largely been displaced by the goals of economic efficiency and the "New Public Management," Critical Social Theory in Public Administration presents a viable alternative that incorporates the latest views of postmodern thinking with the central elements of critical social theory.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

V
14
VI
15
VII
16
VIII
17
IX
19
X
21
XI
24
XII
26
XXXIV
78
XXXV
79
XXXVI
81
XXXVII
82
XXXVIII
83
XXXIX
85
XL
87
XLI
89

XIII
30
XIV
32
XV
35
XVI
38
XVII
41
XVIII
43
XIX
45
XX
47
XXI
49
XXII
51
XXIII
54
XXIV
56
XXV
57
XXVI
59
XXVII
62
XXVIII
64
XXIX
69
XXX
71
XXXI
73
XXXII
75
XXXIII
76
XLII
95
XLIII
97
XLIV
101
XLV
105
XLVI
109
XLVII
111
XLVIII
112
XLIX
113
L
114
LI
116
LII
118
LIII
121
LIV
126
LV
127
LVI
134
LVII
140
LVIII
147
LIX
157
LX
165
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 20 - The human being is in the most literal sense a political animal, not merely a gregarious animal, but an animal which can individuate itself only in the midst of society.

References to this book

Bibliographic information