Critical Grammar of the Hebrew Language

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Wiley and Putnam, 1842 - Hebrew language - 24 pages
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Page vi - ... occulta ; and such doubtless it will continue, so long as we shall remain ignorant of the nature of the union existing between the body and the soul. For the present therefore we must rest content with the ability to trace the connection of such of these representatives of ideas with their originals, as are rather imitations of material sounds than the immediate production of the operations of the mind, viz. onomatopees...
Page iii - This object was still more steadily pursued by Fiirst, who may be said to have founded the third school of Hebrew study. He, Delitzsch, Caspari, and others, while they style the school of Gesenius the empiric, and that of Ewald the rational, term their own the...
Page 128 - Behold, I will raise them out of the place whither ye have sold them, and will return your recompence upon your own head : and I will sell your sons and your daughters into the hand of the children of Judah, and they shall sell them to the Sabeans, to a people far off: for the Lord hath spoken it...
Page iv - ... birth of time; with the knowledge thus acquired, he applies himself anew to the examination of his native tongue and of those more nearly related to it, whose structure now presents to his delighted view a philosophical symmetry and beauty of which before he possessed not the slightest conception. ' The revolution thus produced within the last thirty years in the science of philology, is one which for magnitude and rapidity has not been surpassed in the history of the human mind. When the scholars...
Page vi - Since the external sound belongs entirely to the material and the idea which it represents as exclusively to the immaterial world, the two stand at a distance so remote from each other, that the connection between them has hitherto been a complete res occulta ; and such doubtless it will continue, so long as we shall remain ignorant of the nature of the union existing between the body and the soul. For the present, therefore, we must rest content, with the ability to trace the connection of such...
Page x - ... rest. And this will always be that which lies nearest the soul of man, and is most likely first to affect it ; for the first activity of the organs is exerted to produce a primitive word, and the first causes of such activity are the earliest impressions of the soul. Secondly. In endeavouring to ascertain the primitive by \\sform, we must seek out that word which presents the least complexity in its appearance.
Page 51 - Keri," we have learned to mispronounce as Jehovah. No one can tell now with any certainty what are its true vowels; probably it should be read as Yahveh. With such awe was the word regarded that it was forbidden to be uttered by any except the high priest, and by him only once a year in the Holy of Holies.1 On all other occasions the word 1 One old legend tells that whenever the high priest pronounced the name it was heard as far as to Jericho, but all the hearers immediately forgot it. Later stories...
Page iii - The period has now gone by when a grammar was regarded as complete which exhibited the etymological and syntactical forms of a language as phenomena peculiar to itself, and whose sole merit consisted in the degree of diligence employed in collecting these facts, and the clearness of the arrangement in which they were displayed. In the present age, when philology, by means of the philosophical mode of treatment to which it has been subjected, is raised to the rank of a science, that grammarian will...
Page 103 - ... by suffixing li; as, achukmali, to make good; Ivshpali, to make hot, to heat. Of these suffixes, chi denotes the causing of the action signified by the primitive verb; as, kvllochi, to harden, from kvllo, to be hard; kolichi, to cause to break, from koli, to break; chechi suffixed to a verb denotes the causing by its own subject of the performance of the action signified by the verb by another subject on an object expressed or understood; as, vno vt vlla yj ikhish a.

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