Crop Post-Harvest: Science and Technology, Perishables

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John Wiley & Sons, 2002 - Science - 464 pages
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International trade in high value perishables has grown enormously in the past few decades. In the developed world consumers now expect to be able to eat perishable produce from all parts of the world, and in most cases throughout the year. Perishable plant products are, however, susceptible to physical damage and often have a potential storage life of only a few days.

Given their key importance in the world economy, Crop Post-Harvest Science and Technology: Perishables devotes itself to perishable produce, providing current and comprehensive knowledge on all the key factors affecting post-harvest quality of fruits and vegetables. This volume focuses explicitly on the effects and causes of deterioration, as well as the many techniques and practices implemented to maintain quality though correct handling and storage. As highlighted throughout, regular losses caused by post-harvest spoilage of perishable products can be as much as 50%. A complete understanding, as provided by this excellent volume, is therefore vital in helping to reduce these losses by a significant percentage.

Compiled by members of the world-renowned Natural Resources Institute at the United Kingdom's University of Greenwich, with contributions from experts around the world, this volume is an essential reference for all those working in the area. Researchers and upper-level students in food science, food technology, post-harvest science and technology, crop protection, applied biology and plant and agricultural sciences will benefit from this landmark publication. Libraries in all research establishments and universities where these subjects are studied and taught should ensure that they have several copies for their shelves.

 

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KADER, A. A.; MORRIS, L. L.; STEVENS, M. A.; ALBRIGHT-HOLTON, M. Composition and
flavor quality of fresh market tomatoes as influenced by some postharvest handling procedures.
Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, 103(1): 6-13, 1978b.

Contents

Tomatoes
5
Postharvest practices and problems
12
Bananas Musa spp
24
Conclusions
38
Physiology of citrus fruits
45
Minor decays
69
Food safety
77
Apples
88
Genetic transformation
240
Kiwifruit Guava Passion Fruit and Lychee
247
Lychee
253
Prickly Pear Fruit and Cladodes
264
Postharvest physiology
271
Cucurbits
286
Postharvest physiology of cucurbits
295
Postharvest handling
304

Nutritional value and human health
95
Apple trends and conclusions
102
Mango
108
Ripening conditions
115
Postharvest disorders
122
Postharvest diseases
129
Pineapple
143
Avocado
159
Physiological disorders and their control
165
Maturity and harvesting indices
171
Grapes
187
Postharvest technology for wine and juice grapes
193
Stone Fruit
212
Plum postharvest handling systems
220
Soft Fruit
226
Selective gaseous atmosphere storage
232
Herbs Spices and Flavourings
317
Postharvest losses
331
Tuber storage diseases and disease prevention
339
Postharvest handling of potatoes
349
Onions Shallots and Garlic
360
Onion anatomy and physiology from a storage viewpoint
366
influences of temperature
372
Garlic storage experiments
379
Tropical Root Crops
392
Botany and physiology of yam
399
Pests and diseases of sweet potato
406
Cut Flowers
414
Postharvest handling practices
420
Marketing and consumption
429
Index
439
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About the author (2002)

Debbie Rees and John Orchard are based at the Natural Resources Institute, University of Greenwich, U.K.

Graham Farrell is a technical writer and editor specialising in plant health and analysis.

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