Cross-cultural Perspectives on Families, Work, and Change

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Psychology Press, 1989 - Family & Relationships - 289 pages
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An intriguing study on families and their changing roles, Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Families, Work, and Change provides fresh viewpoints on factors that have an impact on family life and relationships. This thematic volume, with chapters from scholars in Italy, Australia, Israel, Jordan, West Germany, Yugoslavia, Norway, and Finland, is truly international and covers a variety of substantive concerns. Among these is the concern for new familial models which will meld both the individual and the whole into a viable family entity capable of providing for the wishes, needs, and aspirations of the whole and individual members of a family. Discussing various concepts relating to family structure in lieu of the recent shift toward gender equity and the greater acceptance of varied forms of families and lifestyles, this book carefully links the most supportive and nurturing components of modern society with tried and true components of traditional cultures and systems.

The chapters take a conceptual approach, focusing on applications and future needs, policies, and problems surrounding the family. Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Families, Work, and Change represents the increasing shift of mothers to professionals with chapters on increasing female employment and its effect on family life. The much-needed search for explanations of family and society change and for new family models is a common thread throughout the book. In reading this insightful work, family and marriage counselors, students and academicians in family studies, researchers, social workers, and psychologists will see new ways of perceiving families in their critical roles over generations of time.
 

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Contents

The Impact of Social Policies on the Italian Family
19
A More Symmetrical FamilyA Greater Demand
41
Confidants and Helpers in Different Problem Situations
50
Conclusions
64
The Other Side of Employed Parents Life in Slovenia
69
From SelfDirected to OtherDirected Activities
76
The Conceptual Structure of Double Presence
83
Conclusion
102
The Hahn Family in Relation to Tradition and Modernity
168
The Setting
174
It Means Which Family Life? The Nexus of Ideologies
188
Strain and Enrichment in the Role of Employed Mothers
195
Independent Variables
201
Discussion
209
The Negative Definition of Marriage
224
lildless Marriages
239

The Data
109
Discussion
124
The Welfare State and Female Employment
131
Feminization of Childhood
137
Social and Economic Aspects of the Family in an Italian
145
Nuclear and Extended Family Attitudes of Jordanian
251
Discussion and Conclusions
267
Partnership Cultures
275
Catal Huyuk
281
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About the author (1989)

Sussman is UNIDEL Professor of Human Behavior Emeritus at the College of Human Resources at the University of Delaware.

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