Crossing Borders: International Women Students in American Higher Education

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University Press of America, May 16, 2009 - Education - 226 pages
This book explores the processes of self-understanding that take place in a group of Chinese women studying in universities in the United States. In the past few decades, there has been an increasing number of Chinese women attending U.S. universities, yet their psychological experiences within American culture have not been a focus of study by researchers in higher education. Those who crossed geographic, cultural, and psychological borders to study in the U.S. described their change as a basic psychological process called 'reweaving a fragmented self.' This book contributes to the educator's understanding of the diversity of international women's student experiences, expectations, and desires.
 

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Contents

Chapter 01 Introduction
1
Chapter 02 A Critical Review of Traditional Models of Self Development
14
Chapter 03 Grounded Theory Approach
47
Chaptr 04 Reweaving a Fragmented Self in CrossCultural Contexts
64
Chapter 05 Theoretical Implications
153
Chapter 06 Implications to American Higher Education
163
Appendixes
175
Bibliography
183
Index
189
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About the author (2009)

Dongxiao Qin, Ph.D., is associate professor of psychology at Western New England College in Springfield, Massachusetts. She has been published in Feminism & Psychology, International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, Encyclopedia of Women and Gender, and Diversity and Development.

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