Crossing Lines: Research and Policy Networks for Developing Country Education

Front Cover
Noel F. McGinn
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996 - Education - 195 pages
0 Reviews

"Crossing Lines" analyzes the experiences of more than 25 education research networks spanning Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Europe. Their history yields rich insights into the construction and maintenance of communication structures and processes that increase the utility, and the utilization, of education policy research.

Networks are difficult to establish and difficult to maintain. But if maintained, they facilitate effective communication between the various members, leading to generation of shared conceptions of what is important, and how best to go about achieving it. The networks described in this book are intended to help researchers identify problems and design research that is relevant to the countries in which they work. The networks also are intended to help decision-makers identify information that is available, and to signal the kind of information required in the future. This book is an important research and professional tool for educators and education policy-makers, both in national governments and in international assistance agencies.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

A CONCEPTUALIZATION OF NETWORKS AND NETWORKING
1
Sociological Perspectives
3
Evolution from Networks
7
Networks and Institution Building
11
Networking as a Knowledge System
19
Networking Between Researchers and Policy Makers
23
Specialist Newsletters and Networks
29
TRANSREGIONAL NETWORKS
33
Hope or Fallacy?
113
ASIA
117
Educational Research and Networking in East Asia
119
South East Asia Bibliographic and Abstracting Service
125
EUROPE
127
Some Observations for the United Kingdom
129
Seminar on Latin American Education United Kingdom
135
European Network for Research on Learning and Intruction
137

UNESCO Networks in Education and Training Worldwide
35
Commonwealth Networks in Education
39
Consultative Group on Early Childhood Care and Development
43
NORRAG
45
An Historical Perspective
47
Management Issues
57
AFRICA
69
Networking When the State and Higher Education Systems Are Weak
73
Networking Restriction of Information and Democratization in Africa
75
The Culture of Networking in Educational Research in Eastern and Southern Africa
79
The ERNESA Experience
87
Progress and Prospects at MidDecade
91
Networking in West Africa
97
The Educational Research Network in Kenya
103
The Botswana Educational Research Associations Participation in Research and Policy Studies for the National Commission of Education
105
An Aid to Institutional Development
109
Networking in Support of South African Policy Change
111
Activities of the Committee on Educational Research in Cooperation with Third World Countries
139
DSEs Experience with Networking and Institutional Development
141
Scottish Education Action for Development
145
LATIN AMERICA
147
Cultures of Policy Cultures of Research in Latin America
149
Lessons Learned from REDUC 19721992
155
Increasing Network Effectiveness Through Technology
159
REDUC in Relation to Other Latin American Networkd
163
Contact Persons and Organizations in the SEARRAG Network
165
Organizations in the REDUC Network
169
A Partial Listing of Newsletters
173
Glossary of Abbreviations
175
References
179
Index of Persons
183
Index of Topics
185
About the Editor and Contributors
191
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1996)

NOEL McGINN is Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Education at Harvard University and Fellow (emeritus) at the Harvard Institute for International Development. He is coauthor (with R. G. King, R. Guerra, and D. Kline) of The Provincial Universities of Mexico (Praeger, 1979), and coauthor (with F. Reimers) ofIInformed Dialogue: Using Research to Shape Education Policy Around the World (Praeger, 1997). He has published many other books and articles on education and development. He has advised governments, universities, and research centers and international agencies in 24 countries in all continents on issues of education policy. He was the principal investigator of Project BRIDGES, a project funded by the United States Agency for International Development to research the determinants of student achievement in developing countries.

Bibliographic information