Crossing the Deadly Ground: United States Army Tactics, 1865-1899

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University of Alabama Press, Sep 30, 1994 - History - 230 pages

Weapons improved rapidly after the Civil War, raising difficult questions about the battle tactics employed by the United States Army. The most fundamental problem was the dominance of the tactical defensive, when defenders protected by fieldworks could deliver deadly fire from rifles and artillery against attackers advancing in close-ordered lines. The vulnerability of these offensive forces as they crossed the so-called "deadly ground" in front of defensive positions was even greater with the improvement of armaments after the Civil War.

 

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Contents

Samuel Beattys brigade
5
Emory Upton
7
William T Sherman
8
Stephen C Mills with Indian scouts
39
4
54
Twelve of the armys best marksmen
57
Philip H Sheridan
58
Guy V Henry
67
Great Changes Now and to Come
92
The Class of 1891 at Fort Leavenworth
95
Company B of the Seventh Infantry
102
The Whistle an advertisement
107
7
113
A plate from the 1891 infantry manual
115
8
131
A view along the trenches Santiago 1898
152

The Deadly Ground
70
Signal Corps soldiers with field telephones
74
Two plates from the 1891 infantry manual
77
Io A Gatling gun and its crew
80
Position of Carry Saber Mounted
88
Notes
155
Select Bibliography
207
Index
221
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About the author (1994)

Perry D. Jamieson is a historian for the United States Air Force. He is the coauthor, with Grady McWhiney, of Attack and Die: Civil War Military Tactics and the Southern Heritage.

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