Crusader Castles and Modern Histories

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 4, 2007 - History
For the last 150 years the historiography of the Crusades has been dominated by nationalist and colonialist discourses in Europe and the Levant. These modern histories have interpreted the Crusades in terms of dichotomous camps, Frankish and Muslim. In this revisionist study, Ronnie Ellenblum presents an interpretation of Crusader historiography that instead defines military and architectural relations between the Franks, local Christians, Muslims and Turks in terms of continuous dialogue and mutual influence. Through close analysis of siege tactics, defensive strategies and the structure and distribution of Crusader castles, Ellenblum relates patterns of crusader settlement to their environment and demonstrates the influence of opposing cultures on tactics and fortifications. He argues that fortifications were often built according to economic and geographic considerations rather than for strategic reasons or to protect illusory 'frontiers', and that Crusader castles are the most evident expression of a cultural dialogue between east and west.
 

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Contents

From moral failure to a source of pride
3
The narrative of the Crusades and the
18
Nationalist discourse and Crusader archaeology
32
Colonial and anticolonial interpretations
43
Who invented the concentric castles?
62
Crusader cities Muslim cities and the
73
is it possible
84
Small castle
97
Borders and their defence
105
Borders frontiers and centres
118
The geography of fear and the creation of the
146
The distribution ofFrankish castles during the
165
Siege and defence of castles during the
189
Frankish siege tactics
203
Development of Muslim siege tactics
217
The appearance of the concentric castles
231

Table 71 cont
98
+
99
a new
275

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