Cuentos y leyendas

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Editorial Universidad de Costa Rica, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 932 pages
5 Reviews
Con la coordinaci n de Mario Roberto Morales, en esta edici n cr tica colaboran estudiosos de talla internacional como Martin Lienhard, Ana Merino e Isabel Arredondo. la intenci n, como lo apunta Jean-Philippe Barnab , otro de los colaboradores, no es recopilar la totalidad de los relatos breves de Asturias, "sino m s bien destacar el car cter en cierto modo circular de su itinerario creativo, mostrando la insistencia con que esta (re)creaci n gen rica llamada leyenda, que inaugura su producci n, vuelve a aparecer en los tramos finales de su carrera".
 

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Contents

Lecturas del texto
551
Dossier de la obra
759
VIL Bibliografía e índice p
897
Intrc I Introducción XIII
927
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Novelist, playwright, poet, translator, and diplomat, Miguel Asturias received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1967 for what was considered highly colored writing rooted in national individuality and Indian tradition. His first novel, El Senor Presidente, a fictional account of the period of violence and human degradation under the Guatemalan dictator Estrada Cabrera, was completed in 1932 but not published until 1946 for political reasons. It was pioneering in its use of surrealistic structures and Indian myth as integrated parts of the novel's structure. Mulata (1963) uses a Guatemalan version of the legend of Faust as a point of departure for Asturias's inventive use of Indian myth. In 1966, Asturias received the Lenin Peace Prize for writings that expose American intervention against the Guatemalan people. Following the 1954 uprising, Asturias was deprived of his citizenship by the new government and lived in exile for eight years. After the election of President Julio Cesar Mendez Montenegro in 1967, he was restored to his country's diplomatic services as ambassador to Paris and continued to publish.

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