Cultivating High-Quality Teaching Through Induction and Mentoring

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Corwin Press, 2005 - Education - 188 pages
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The research shows that induction and mentoring programs are effective. While many schools have instituted induction and/or mentoring programmes, we know little about what actually works in these types of programmes. Carol A Bartell bridges the gap between knowledge and practice with this book. Through her extensive research on induction and mentoring programs, she has identified the elements of successful programmes. Induction programmes are systematic, organized plans for the support and development of new teachers in the initial 1-3 years of service.

Because teachers begin with different levels of preparation, the author addresses how to differentiate programmes to meet differing needs, from teachers who have completed a traditional university programme to those who have entered teaching through alternative certification. It also looks at how various school environments (urban, suburban, and rural) affect the first three years of teaching. Rather than focusing on survival skills, this book emphasizes high-quality teaching through the use of standards-based teaching, teacher assessments, and reflective practice. The book also contains a special emphasis on under-prepared teachers and urban schools-those most in need of effective induction and mentoring and also the group that benefits the most from these types of programmes

 

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Contents

CHAPTER 1 THE CHALLENGES FACING BEGINNING TEACHERS
1
CHAPTER 2 UNDERSTANDING THE STAGES OF TEACHER DEVELOPMENT
21
CHAPTER 3 THE CHARACTERISTICS OF EFFECTIVE INDUCTION PROGRAMS
43
CHAPTER 4 MENTORING STRATEGIES AND BEST PRACTICES
71
CHAPTER 5 URBAN SCHOOLS AND INDUCTION
93
CHAPTER 6 STANDARDSBASED TEACHING AND REFLECTIVE PRACTICE
115
CHAPTER 7 TEACHER ASSESSMENT
143
CHAPTER 8 DEVELOPING INDUCTION POLICIES TO SHAPE INDUCTION PRACTICES
165
REFERENCES
177
INDEX
183
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About the author (2005)

Carol A. Bartell has been interested in teacher induction since 1988, when she first became involved with what was then the California New Teacher Project, a pilot project with fifteen districts in California. Her role was first as a faculty member at the University of Pacific in Stockton, and shortly after as a staff member at the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing, and finally, as a member of the Commission representing the independent California Colleges and Universities in her role as Dean of the School of Education at California Lutheran University. Her interest in assisting teachers in urban schools led her to accept, beginning in the fall of 2003, the position of Dean of the Charter College of Education at California State University, Los Angeles. Dr. Bartell has worked on a number of efforts related to teacher induc-tion. She served as project officer for the evaluation of the California induc-tion programs, led the initial state task force that developed the California Standards for the Teaching Profession, and led the development of the peer review process for the Beginning Teacher Support and Assessment Program. She has served on a number of national task forces and Commissions related to induction, including the National Commission on Professional Development and Support of Novice Teachers sponsored by the Association of Teacher Educators and Kappa Delta Pi, and the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC). Before Dr. Bartell entered the state policy and the higher education arena, she was a teacher. Her P-12 teaching career spans eleven years in five different states in urban, rural, and suburban settings. She remembers what it was like to begin anew as a novice in a different teaching context. She still enjoys getting into the classroom, when her schedule permits, to work with university students preparing for that very important work in schools.

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