Cultural Landscapes: Balancing Nature and Heritage in Preservation Practice

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Richard W. Longstreth
U of Minnesota Press, 2008 - Architecture - 218 pages
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Preservation has traditionally focused on saving prominent buildings of historical or architectural significance. Preserving cultural landscapes-the combined fabric of the natural and man-made environments-is a relatively new and often misunderstood idea among preservationists, but it is of increasing importance. The essays collected in this volume-case studies that include the Little Tokyo neighborhood in Los Angeles, the Cross Bronx Expressway, and a rural island in Puget Sound-underscore how this approach can be fruitfully applied. Together, they make clear that a cultural landscape perspective can be an essential underpinning for all historic preservation projects.

 

Contributors: Susan Calafate Boyle, National Park Service; Susan Buggey, U of Montreal; Michael Caratzas, Landmarks Preservation Commission (NYC); Courtney P. Fint, West Virginia Historic Preservation Office; Heidi Hohmann, Iowa State U; Hillary Jenks, USC; Randall Mason, U Penn; Robert Z. Melnick, U of Oregon; Nora Mitchell, National Park Service; Julie Riesenweber, U of Kentucky; Nancy Rottle, U of Washington; Bonnie Stepenoff, Southeast Missouri State U.

 

Richard Longstreth is professor of American civilization and director of the graduate program in historic preservation at George Washington University.

 

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Contents

The Challenges of Cultural Landscape for Preservation
1
Part I Interpreting Landscape
21
Part II Balancing Change and Continuity
107
Contributors
211
Index
213
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About the author (2008)

Longstreth is Professor of American Civilzation in the Department of American Studies at George Washington University.

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