Cultural Values and the Family Beyond Year 2000: Principles, Policies and Reality

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Universal-Publishers, 2002 - Family & Relationships - 335 pages
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Culture is dynamic. But in cultural (ethnic) groups certain elements of culture such as cultural values relating to the family are regarded indispensable for social order, and therefore for the survival of the society. Accordingly those concerned strive to maintain social order by rediscovering what they regard as traditional cultural values. The thesis of this study is: the process of the development of cultural values relating to the family can be defined as "Spiral Involution"; namely a development through interparticipative stages, each stage (past or present) participating in the other, as impulse to further development. Therefore the proposition of this study is: dialogal-value-system-concordance, a conscious intervention by those concerned through dialogue towards optimal social order.
 

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Contents

C General Summary of Field Experience
170
CHAPTER EIGHT
176
B Variables Categories and Attributes to be analysed
177
i Religious Affiliation
178
ii SpiritualReligious faith Church Attendance
181
2Evaluation of Marriage and Family Life
186
a Civil Church Marriage
187
Rate of Divorce and Remarriage
192

C Historical Development of Research Approaches
44
1Period of General Knowledge
46
2Period of Specialisation
48
3Period of Interdisciplinary Research
57
4Period of Evaluation
60
5Period of Institutional and Organisational Research
64
Part II
68
CHAPTER THREE
69
2 Cultural Values and Society
71
3 Climate
79
B Demography
84
C Economy
91
CHAPTER FOUR
93
B Method of Approach
95
CHAPTE FIVE
98
B Manner of Operation
99
2 Church Ecclesiastical Interventions
106
Interventions
111
C Competence of Agents
116
D Source of Information
119
CHAPTER SIX
122
A Suggested Approaches to Evaluation
124
B Selfappraisal of Agencies
128
C External Appraisal
133
Part III
144
CHAPTER SEVEN
145
B Method of Approach
146
1The Plan
147
2Criterion for Choice of Variables
151
3Developing Indicators
153
4Sampling
155
5Construction of Questionnaires
158
6 Administration of Questionnaires
162
7Field Observations
165
ii Theatre
167
c Authority Who controls what
199
3 Children
206
d MotherhoodFatherhood and WorkLeisure
207
e Reasons for against Begetting Children
208
f Number of Children
210
g ValuesIdeals Wished for Children
214
i Material GoodsMoney Television
222
ii Social Relationship with brotherssisters friends and other neighbours
225
3 Interrelationship among Generations
226
a Childrens Ideas Attitudes Behaviour
230
ii Respect towards Parents and other relatives
234
b Marriage Partners and Inlaws
235
5 Evaluation of Marriage and Family in General
238
Part IV
243
CHAPTER NINE
244
A The Quantity of Sample houses visited and mailed questionnaires returned
245
2 MAIL SURVEY
247
B Probable Influence of Statistical Errors on Results
248
C Comparison with Results of other researches
252
1 Demographic Survey Results
254
2ValueIndex Surveys Results
256
D Trends and Indications
259
CHAPTER TEN
262
B Assessment of Justification
263
C Resultant Proposition for Appropriate Intervention
266
CHAPTER ELEVEN
271
1 Cultural Values
274
2 The Family
278
B Methodological Approach
281
General Conclusion
285
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
302
Index
331
APPENDICES
337
Copyright

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Page 46 - ... beings appear to get as much joy and sorrow from the family as they always have, and seem as bent as ever on taking part in family life. In most of the world, the traditional family may be shaken, but the institution will probably enjoy a longer life than any nation now in existence. The family does not seem to be a powerful institution, like the military, the church, or the state, but it seems to be the most resistant to conquest, or to the efforts people make to reshape it. Any specific family...
Page 39 - McLennan tried to show that the institutions of marriage and the family as we know them in Western society must have developed from a condition of 'primitive promiscuity' through a number of distinct stages, which included matriliny, when descent was traced through women only, polyandry...
Page 39 - ... primitive promiscuity" through a number of distinct stages which included matriliny, when descent was traced through women only, polyandry, when husbands shared one wife, and finally patriliny, when descent was traced through men о only.
Page 317 - INKELES, Alex. 1964. What is sociology? An introduction to the discipline and profession. Englewood Cliffs NJ : Prentice-Hall.
Page 51 - II, 55-78; Inheritance, property and marriage in Africa and Eurasia, Sociology, 1969, 3, 55-76. CHAPTER ONE Comparative Sociology and the Decolonization of the Social Sciences The Background BOTH sociology and anthropology have grown out of the attempts of man to make sense of his social environment, the behaviour of his fellow men, the variations between different societies and the changes that have taken place over time. In the Greek world, Aristotle examined some 150 possible constitutions; in...
Page 39 - ... in some way" is important because of a few striking cases in which there is no domestic family of parents and children. On the other hand, a few societies do not recognise the biological relationship between a woman's mate and her children, but still think they should have a social father.
Page 56 - ... it was assumed as a matter of dogma that the functional integration of social institutions was intrinsically stable, that is to say. that, in the absence of external political interference everything will go on as before
Page 9 - Satisfying the needs and standards of living even in advanced societies through re-establishing the responsibility of individuals: families and local communities for their own wellbeing, especially the role of the family in caring for its members and raising and redistributing resources

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