Culture and Power at the Edges of the State: National Support and Subversion in European Border Regions

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Thomas M. Wilson, Hastings Donnan
LIT Verlag Münster, 2005 - History - 357 pages
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Borders are where the state is keen to stress its presence and yet are simultaneously places where that presence is challenged. They are sites of resistance to the state, and at the same time places where the national interest is vigorously maintained. This constant ambiguity generates questions about the dynamics of borderland-state relations, and about how what happens along the border can undermine state policies. Using case studies of national and state relations in borderlands in Europe, this book seeks to understand structures of power.

Thomas M. Wilson is a researcher at the Department of Anthropology at the State University of New York, Binghamton University. Hastings Donann is a researcher at the School of Anthopological Studies at Queen's University in Belfast, Northern Ireland (U.K.).

 

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Contents

III
1
IV
31
V
55
VI
81
VII
103
VIII
127
IX
155
X
191
XI
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XII
255
XIII
289
XIV
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XV
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Page 7 - ... [The] formal framework of economic and political power exists alongside or intermingled with various other kinds of informal structure which are interstitial, supplementary, parallel to it. ... The anthropologist has a professional license to study such . . . structures in complex society and to expose their relationship to the major strategic, overarching institutions" ("Kinship, Friendship, and Patron-Client Relations in Complex Societies,
Page 8 - ... statehood, either as a reality or as an aspiration. Nations and states are specifically territorial entities - they explicitly claim, and are based on, particular geographical territories, as distinct from merely occupying geographical space which is true of all social activity (Anderson 1986: 117). The nationalist ideal is that the two entities should coincide geographically in nation states: the nation's territory and the state's territory should be one and the same, each nation having its...

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