Culture of the Fork: A Brief History of Everyday Food and Haute Cuisine in Europe

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, Aug 13, 2013 - Cooking - 224 pages
1 Review

The Renaissance and the age of discovery introduced Europeans to exotic cultures, mores, manners, and ideas. That kitchen revolution led to the development of new utensils and table manners. Rebora discusses the availability of resources, how people kept from starving in the winter, how they farmed, how tastes developed, what the lower classes ate, and what the aristocracy enjoyed.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

chapter
1
chapter
11
chapter three
27
Cheese
35
chapter
43
chapter seven
53
chapter eight
59
chapter nine
71
chapter twelve
103
chapter thirteen
111
chapter fifteen
129
chapter sixteen
141
chapter seventeen
153
chapter eighteen
163
Dining with Christopher Columbus
169
Bibliography
179

chapter
87
chapter eleven
97

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2013)

Giovanni Rebora is professor of economic history and chair of the Department of Modern and Contemporary History at the University of Genoa. In 1983 he organized the First International Convention on the History of Culture and Food. In 1992 he edited Columbus at Table and has published Medieval Italian Cuisine Between East and West.

Albert Sonnenfeld is Chevalier Professor of French and Comparative Literatures at the University of Southern California and is a longtime member of the National Board of Directors of the American Institute of Wine and Food. He is the English-language editor of Food: A Culinary History and a frequent contributor on culinary topics to such publications as The Languages of Wine and Food and Ideology.


Bibliographic information