Curating Archaeological Collections: From the Field to the Repository

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Rowman Altamira, 2003 - Social Science - 150 pages
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Curation is rarely the first topic raised in an archaeological seminar or addressed in a fieldwork design. And, the authors point out, it is too rarely discussed at all. But the current crisis in repository space has increased awareness that the long-term conservation and preservation of the material remains and field notes of an archaeological project are as important as the finds themselves. Sullivan and Childs, two experienced archaeologists and museum professionals, provide an introductory guide to curation for archaeologists. Crucial to this process is the recognition of curation issues before the first day of fieldwork and continuous involvement of curators in the process throughout the archaeological project. The authors provide guidance on how to manage a collection, what to do with field notes and other project documents, how to find a repository for the collection, and how to adjust field practices so that the process runs smoothly. This brief, practical guide will be invaluable to all field archaeologists and their students, and to museum professionals who curate archaeological collections.
 

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Contents

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About the author (2003)

Lynne P. Sullivan is curator of archaeology at the Frank H. McClung Museum and research associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Tennessee. S. Terry Childs is an archaeologist in the Archeology and Ethnography Program of the National Park Service in Washington, D.C.

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