Curious English Words and Phrases: The Truth Behind the Expressions We Use

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Exisle Publishing, 2012 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 432 pages
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Have you ever wondered where terms like 'end of your tether', 'gets my goat' or 'letting ones hair down' come from? Or why we call some people 'geezers', 'sugar daddies' or 'lounge lizards'? Or where the words 'eavesdropping', 'nickname' and 'D-Day' come from?They are just a few of the many words and phrases that language expert Max Cryer examines in this fact-filled and fun new book. Max explains where these curious expressions come from, what they mean and how they are used. Along the way he tells a host of colourful anecdotes and dispels quite a few myths Did Churchill originate the phrase 'black dog'? And if 'ivory tower' can be found in the Bible, why has its meaning changed so drastically?'Curious English Words and Phrases' is a treasure trove for lovers of language. Informative, amusing and value for money, this book is 'the real McCoy'. From 'couch potato' to 'Bob's your uncle', you'll find the explanation here!
 

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Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
9
Section 3
64
Section 4
113
Section 5
119
Section 6
187
Section 7
192
Section 8
201
Section 14
295
Section 15
312
Section 16
365
Section 17
393
Section 18
397
Section 19
400
Section 20
416
Section 21
417

Section 9
209
Section 10
220
Section 11
246
Section 12
256
Section 13
292
Section 22
421
Section 23
424
Section 24
428
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Max Cryer is a seasoned researcher and writer on aspects of the English language. A well-known broadcaster and entertainer, he hosts a weekly radio slot on the subject. In a long career, he has been a schoolteacher, a compere and TV host, as well as a singer in London, Las Vegas and Hollywood. Max is the author of 'Love Me Tender', 'Who Said That First?', 'The Godzone Dictionary', 'Hear Our Voices, We Entreat', 'Preposterous Proverbs' and 'Every Dog Has It's Day'.

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