Customizing the Body: The Art and Culture of Tattooing

Front Cover
Temple University Press, Aug 21, 2009 - Art - 280 pages
0 Reviews

Originally published in 1989, this ground-breaking ethnographic exploration of tattooing—and the art world surrounding it—covers the history, anthropology and sociology of body modification practices; the occupational experience of the tattooist; the process and social consequences of becoming a tattooed person; and the prospects of "serious" tattooing becoming an accepted art form. Curiously, despite the greater prevalence of tattoos and body modification in today’s society, there is still a stigma of deviance associated with people who get or ink tattoos.

Retaining the core of the original book, this revised and expanded edition offers a new preface by the author and a new chapter focusing on the changes that have occurred in the tattoo world. A section on the new scholarly literature that has emerged, as well as the new modes of body modification that have come into vogue are included along with a new gallery of photographs that shows some splendid examples of contemporary tattoo art. A directory of artists' websites invites readers to discover the range of work being done around the world—from “suits” (full body tattoos) to skulls.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Body Alteration Artistic Production and the Social World of Tattooing
1
Becoming and Being a Tattooed Person
36
Tattooing as a Career and an Occupation
62
Photographs
109
Risk and Social Control in the Studio
117
Tattooing and the Social Definition of Art
149
Body Modification Then and Now
164
Methodological Appendix
189
Selected Tattoo Artist Websites
203
Notes
205
References
221
Index
239
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page xviii - It was then and still is my belief that any group of persons - prisoners, primitives, pilots, or patients - develop a life of their own that becomes meaningful, reasonable, and normal once you get close to it, and that a good way to learn about any of these worlds is to submit oneself in the company of the members to the daily round of petty contingencies to which they are subject.
Page xviii - The central principle that drives the chapter, and underpins the better studies, is that deviants, '[like] any group of persons ... develop a life of their own that becomes meaningful, reasonable, and normal once you get close to it and ... a good way to learn about any of these worlds is to submit oneself in the company of the members to the daily round of petty contingencies to which they are subject
Page xxiv - Tattoo Consumption: Risk and Regret in the Purchase of a Socially Marginal Service', Advances in Consumer Research 12: 17-22. Sanders, C. (1989) Customizing the Body: The Art and Culture of Tattooing. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press. Shilling, C. (1993) The Body and Social Theory. London: Sage. (ed.) The Body's Perilous Pleasures: Dangerous Desires and Contemporary Culture.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2009)

Clinton R. Sanders is a Professor in the Sociology Department at the University of Connecticut. His most recent book isUnderstanding Dogs: Living and Working with Canine Companions (Temple), which received the Charles Horton Cooley Award given by the Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction.

D. Angus Vail is Associate Professor of Sociology at Willamette University in Salem, OR. He is also co-editor (with Erich Goode) of Extreme Deviance.

Bibliographic information