Cyclopedia of Drawing, Volume 2

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American school of correspondence, 1906 - Mechanical drawing
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Page 299 - keystone." THE CORINTHIAN ORDER. 82 The Corinthian is an elaborately formal and dignified Order, and all the details which enter into its composition will bear analyzing with the greatest possible care. 83. The Corinthian capital (Plate XVII) is in form similar to a cylindrical vase covered by an abacus with hollowed sides and with corners cut at an angle of forty-five degrees, in plan with the sides of the square containing the abacus. Against this vase or "bell" are placed two rows of leaves whose...
Page 80 - He now sees the top of No. 2, but the top of No. 1 seems some distance above, and he naturally concludes that No. 2 appears shorter than No. 1. As the observer looks at the top of No. 2, No. 3 is still invisible, and, in order to see it, he has to lower his eye still further.
Page 130 - Plate IV. should now be solved. PARALLEL OR ONE-POINT PERSPECTIVE. 79. When the diagram of an object is placed with one of its principal systems of horizontal lines parallel to the picture plane, it is said to be in Parallel Perspective. This is illustrated in Fig. 24, by the rectangular block there shown. One system of horizontal lines in the...
Page 97 - NOTATION. 46. In order to avoid confusion between the vertical, horizontal, and perspective projections of the points and lines in the drawing, it becomes necessary to adopt some systematic method of lettering the different points and lines. The following method will be found convenient, and has been adopted in these notes. If the student will letter each point or line as it is found, in accordance with this notation, he will be able to read his drawings at a glance, and any desired projection of...
Page 380 - ... profile of a rib and the two coffers one on each side of the rib, each eighteen parts wide, and the two coffers seven parts each and three parts in depth. Next draw in on the plan two semi-circles, one of three entablatures and three parts radius, the other of three entablatures six parts radius. Having thus established the whole profile of the springing of the cupola, draw from each division a radius to the center; then show above this plan, centering on the same axis, the section of the cupola,...
Page 306 - ... modillions up to the lower angle of the cyma; one for the cyma reversa; one for the corona; two for the upper cyma and its listel;- and five for the cyma-recta. 95. The cornice of the Corinthian order is distinguished by the consoles which support the corona and which are called modillions. The modillion is composed of two volutes or spirals similar to the keystone which we have already analyzed in Fig. 16, but while in the keystone the large spiral...
Page 359 - ... following the measurements for the separate parts therein given. The placing of these details on the plate, with their relative size, lettering, etc., is to be as shown in the model, Plate VIII. Either the Mutular or the Denticular Order may be drawn out, as the student may prefer. PLATE E. 139. The Ionic Order is to be drawn and the finished plate is to correspond in appearance and arrangement with the model, Plate XIII, and is to follow the construction and proportions given in plates X, XI...
Page 77 - Qwill be formed by the visual rays reflected from its surface. These rays form a pyramid or cone which has the observer's eye for its apex, and the object in space for its base. 3. If a transparent plane M, Fig. 2, be placed in such a position that it will intersect the cone of visual rays as shown, the intersection will be a projection of the object upon the plane M. It will be noticed that the projecting lines, or projectors, instead of being perpendicular to the plane, as is the case in orthographic...
Page 93 - It will readily be understood that in a complicated problem, the overlapping of the vertical and horizontal projections might result in some confusion. It is, therefore, usually customary, after having revolved the two coordinate planes into the position shown in Fig. 9, to slide them apart in a direction perpendicular to their line of intersection, until the two planes occupy a position similar to that shown in Fig. 9a. 38. It will be remembered from the course on projections which the student is...
Page 49 - ... one drawing board; six thumb tacks; one box natural drawing models; one Cross slate; one Cross pencil; one-half dozen sheets of tracing paper. After the preliminary practice with straight lines and curves the student may proceed to execute Plates I and II. . PLATE I. The principal dimensions in inches are indicated on the model plate. All dimensions and proportions should however be determined by the eye alone. Measurements may be used as a test after the squares are laid in. The figures on the...

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