DNA: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule that Shook the World: A Graphic Guide to the Molecule that Shook the World

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Columbia University Press, Feb 22, 2011 - Science - 272 pages
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With humor, depth, and philosophical and historical insight, DNA reaches out to a wide range of readers with its graphic portrayal of a complicated science. Suitable for use in and out of the classroom, this volume covers DNA's many marvels, from its original discovery in 1869 to early-twentieth-century debates on the mechanisms of inheritance and the deeper nature of life's evolution and variety.

Even readers who lack a background in science and philosophy will learn a tremendous amount from this engaging narrative. The book elucidates DNA's relationship to health and the cause and cure of disease. It also covers the creation of new life forms, nanomachines, and perspectives on crime detection, and considers the philosophical sources of classical Darwinian theory and recent, radical changes in the understanding of evolution itself. Already these developments have profoundly affected our notions about living things. Borin Van Loon's humorous illustrations recount the contributions of Gregor Mendel, Frederick Griffith, James Watson, and Francis Crick, among other biologists, scientists, and researchers, and vividly depict the modern controversies surrounding the Human Genome Project and cloning.

 

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User Review  - TheDivineOomba - LibraryThing

I took a genetics course in college. Needless to say, I didn't do so well. This book Sums up everything from that class, with easy to understand pictures. Some concepts that I was really didn't ... Read full review

Contents

A Brief History of Genetics
5
What is DNA?
28
The New Biology
34
DNA Replication
58
What Information is Stored in a Gene?
60
Where Did the Notion of Messenger RNA Come From?
67
Transcription
70
Translation
75
The Human Genome Unveiled
163
High Throughput Sequencing
165
SNPs
166
Manipulatating the Genome
167
Cloning the Organism The History
171
From the Nucleus of an Intestinal Cell to a Whole Frog
173
Making Tissues from Stem Cells
174
Changing Mature Cells to Stem Cells
176

Genetic Code
85
PaJaMo and the Operon
88
The Diversity of Gene Expression
95
A Brief Remider of Relative Size
102
A Brief Reminder of Genes in Humans
104
Prokaryotes versus Eukaryotes
105
Restriction Enzymes and Genetic Engineering
114
Cloning DNA Fragments
121
Cloning and Sequencing Genes
124
Exons Introns and Splicing
136
Chromatin and Histones
143
Gene Families
144
Controlling Genes for Antibodies
146
Chromosomes
154
Telomeres
155
Hidden Layers of Gene Regulation
156
Epigenetics
157
Prions
159
The Human Genome Project
161
The Impact of New Genetics on Medical Research
177
Diagnosis
180
DNA and the Judicial System
182
PCR
185
The Impact of DNA
188
Biotechnology
196
The Origin of Life
199
Tinkering
212
Selfish Genes
213
Evolving Evolution Sources of Darwinian Theory
218
The Big Gene Bet of the Last Millennium 1999 AD
220
The Problems with Gradualism
221
Changes in the Stickleback Fish
229
DNA Genetics and the Changing Views of Human Evolution
230
Birdsong and Language
231
Epilogue to the First Edition
233
Glossary
245
Reading List
257
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Israel Rosenfield received an M.D. from the New York University School of Medicine and a Ph.D. from Princeton University. He teaches at the City University of New York and his books, which have been translated into a number of languages, include The Invention of Memory: A New View of the Brain; The Strange, Familiar, and Forgotten: An Anatomy of Consciousness (revised and expanded French edition, 2005); and the satirical novel Freud's 'Megalomania', a New York Times notable book of the year. He has been a Guggenheim Fellow and a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books. A frequent speaker at international art/science events, he has written essays and satirical pieces for a number of exhibition catalogues of contemporary artists.

Edward Ziff studied Chemistry at Columbia University and received his PhD in Biochemistry at Princeton University. He then joined the laboratory of DNA sequencing pioneer Fred Sanger in Cambridge, where Ziff helped to develop the first DNA sequencing techniques. He has worked on problems of animal virus gene control at the London Imperial Cancer Research Fund Laboratories and transcriptional regulation in animal cells at the Rockefeller University in New York. Ziff has also been a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and his research includes many "firsts" in the areas of gene structure and control, cancer biology, and, more recently, brain function. He is professor of biochemistry and neural science at the New York University School of Medicine.

Borin Van Loon has been a freelance illustrator since 1977. He has designed and illustrated fifteen documentary comic books on subjects from Darwin to Psychotherapy and Buddha to Statistics. He created an eclectic collage/cartoon mural on the subject of DNA and genetics for the Health Matters Gallery in London's Science Museum.

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