Daisy Miller

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Broadview Press, Nov 14, 2011 - Fiction - 275 pages
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Henry James’s Daisy Miller was an immediate sensation when it was first published in 1878 and has remained popular ever since. In this novella, the charming but inscrutable young American of the title shocks European society with her casual indifference to its social mores. The novella was popular in part because of the debates it sparked about foreign travel, the behaviour of women, and cultural clashes between people of different nationalities and social classes.

This Broadview edition presents an early version of James’s best-known novella within the cultural contexts of its day. In addition to primary materials about nineteenth-century womanhood, foreign travel, medicine, philosophy, theatre, and art—some of the topics that interested James as he was writing the story—this volume includes James’s ruminations on fiction, theatre, and writing, and presents excerpts of Daisy Miller as he rewrote it for the theatre and for a much later and heavily revised edition.

 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
11
Introduction
13
A Brief Chronology
35
A Note on the Text
39
A Study in Two Parts
41
Henry James on Daisy Miller
101
Literary and Artistic Influences
109
Henry James and the Craft of Fiction
113
From Henry James Daisy Miller A Comedy in Three Acts 1883
141
Contemporary Reviews of Daisy Miller A Comedy in ThreeActs 1883
149
On Henry Jamess Revisions
151
The NineteenthCentury New Woman
167
NineteenthCentury Travel
191
Roman Fever
207
Daisy Miller and the Tradition of Pragmatism
211
Works Cited and Recommended Reading
215

Contemporary Reviews of Daisy Miller 187882
121
Henry James and the Craft of Drama
135

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About the author (2011)

Kristin Boudreau is Professor of English at Worcester Polytechnic Institute.

Megan Stoner Morgan is a doctoral student specializing in nineteenth-century American and British fiction at the University of Georgia.

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