Daisy Miller: A Study in Two Parts

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Amereon House, 1987 - Fiction - 98 pages
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"Travelling in Europe with her family, Daisy Miller, an exquisitely beautiful young American woman, presents her fellow-countryman Winterbourne with a dilemma he cannot resolve. Is she deliberately flouting social convention in the outspoken way she talks and acts, or is she simply ignorant of them? When she strikes up an intimate friendship with an urbane young Italian, her flat refusal to observe the codes of respectable behaviour leave her perilously exposed. In Daisy Miller James dramatized the conflict between old-world manners and nouveau riche tourists, and created his first great portrait of an enigmatic and independent American woman." "This edition contains a chronology, further reading, notes and an introduction by David Lodge discussing the genesis of the tale and James's controversial revision of the text for his New York Edition. Appendices include a note on James's adaptation of his story as a play."--BOOK JACKET.

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Contents

Section 1
11
Section 2
12
Section 3
15
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Henry James, American novelist and literary critic, was born in 1843 in New York City. Psychologist-philosopher William James was his brother. By the age of 18, he had lived in France, England, Switzerland, Germany, and New England. In 1876, he moved to London, having decided to live abroad permanently. James was a prolific writer; his writings include 22 novels, 113 tales, 15 plays, approximately 10 books of criticism, and 7 travel books. His best-known works include Daisy Miller, The Turn of the Screw, The Portrait of a Lady, The Ambassadors, and The American Scene. His works of fiction are elegant and articulate looks at Victorian society; while primarily set in genteel society, James subtlely explores class issues, sexual repression, and psychological distress. Henry James died in 1916 in London. The James Memorial Stone in Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, commemorates him.

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