Dakota: A Novel

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Viking, 2008 - Fiction - 414 pages
2 Reviews
In this sequel to Grimes's Biting the Moon, Andi Oliver, amnesiac and drifter, is still running from the memory - her only memory - of an occurrence in a Santa Fe bed-and-breakfast. Forced to invent details of her past as she manages to hang on to a precarious present ("Lying," says one co-worker, "it's what the girl does."), Andi moves from one small-town job to another across Idaho, across Montana, and into North Dakota. In Dakota she gets herself hired at Klavan's, a massive pig farming facility that specializes in the dark art of modern livestock management. As Andi begins to uncover the truth about Klavan's and its sister facility, Big Sun, a stranger out of her past, who has been stalking her for more than a year, appears at her door demanding information of which she has no memory. Dakota signals the return of one of Martha Grimes's most intrepid heroines, a young woman who invents her life step-by-step as she moves through a landscape that throws up one danger after another. Set against the breathtakingly expansive background of the plains, Dakota will reward Grimes's legion of fans, and readers of western literature as a whole.

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User Review  - EmScape - LibraryThing

This book is disturbing both because of its complete lack of closure as well as the horrible things that happen to animals. So, it's basically just like the first Andi Oliver book. Andi has graduated ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Scratch - LibraryThing

If you're going to write a book and place the main character amongst horses, you should know the difference between a halter and a bridle. You should also know that there is no such thing as a "chestnut bay." An irritating and implausible sequel to the first Andi Oliver book. Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Martha Grimes is the bestselling author of twenty-three novels, including The Old Wine Shades and Dust.

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