Dallas Stoudenmire: El Paso Marshal

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University of Oklahoma Press, 1969 - History - 162 pages
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Before Dallas Stoudenmire accepted the position as marshal of El Paso, there existed no authority except that of the six-shooter, and very little precedent for a peace officer to follow. No one before had held the job for more than a couple of months. Yet, within two years, with the help of Jim Gillett, his young deputy, Stoudenmire had cleaned up the town, a task that earned him many enemies and, in the end, death.

This is the story of Dallas Stoudenmire-auburn-haired, fiery-eyed, six-foot, two-inch gunfighter, container of laughter, liquor, and death-during the two tumultuous years in the early 1880’s when he served as almost the only law north of the Rio Grande and west of Fort Worth.

 

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A great book written by a great man.

Contents

CHAPTER Wanteda Town tamer
1
El Paso in transition
11
Attempted assassination
48
i The Railroad comes to Town
55
Crime bustingEl Paso style
61
s Stoudenmires feud with the Texas Rangers
70
The strange life death
82
The Stoudenmire Manning Brothers feud
92
Stoudenmires Political feud
100
Prelude to a gunfight
109
End of an era
119
IS Day of judgement
125
Bibliography
147
Acknowledgements
153
Copyright

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About the author (1969)

Leon Claire Metz, a biographer and historian of the early Southwest, lives in El Paso, Texas. He is also the author of Pat Garrett: Story of a Western Lawman and Dallas Stoudenmire: El Paso Marshal, both published by the University of Oklahoma Press.

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