Dams and Development: A New Framework for Decision-making : the Report of the World Commission on Dams

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Earthscan, 2000 - Nature - 404 pages
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By the year 2000, the world had built more than 45,000 large dams to irrigate crops, generate power, control floods in wet times and store water in dry times. Yet, in the last century, large dams also disrupted the ecology of half the world's rivers, displaced tens of millions of people from their homes and left nations burdened with debt. Their impacts have inevitably generated growing controversy and conflicts. Resolving their role in meeting water and energy needs is vital for the future and illustrates the complex development challenges that face our societies. The Report of the World Commission on Dams: - is the product of an unprecedented global public policy effort to bring governments, the private sector and civil society together in one process - provides the first comprehensive global and independent review of the performance and impacts of dams - presents a new framework for water and energy resources development - develops an agenda of seven strategic priorities with corresponding criteria and guidelines for future decision-making. Challenging our assumptions, the Commission sets before us the hard, rigorous and clear-eyed evidence of exactly why nations decide to build dams and how dams can affect human, plant and animal life, for better or for worse. Dams and Development: A New Framework for Decision-Making is vital reading on the future of dams as well as the changing development context where new voices, choices and options leave little room for a business-as-usual scenario.
 

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Contents

Water and Development
3
Understanding the Large Dams Debate
17
THE WCD GLOBAL REVIEW OF LARGE DAMS
35
Hydropower Dams
49
MultiPurpose Dams
62
Ecosystems and Large Dams Environmental
73
Gross greenhouse emissions from reservoirs
76
Ecosystem Enhancement
86
Comprehensive Options Assessment
221
Sustaining Rivers and Livelihoods
234
Recognising Entitlements and Sharing Benefits
240
Sharing Rivers for Peace Development and Security
251
Criteria and Guidelines Applying
259
Dams in the Pipeline
276
Beyond the Commission An Agenda
309
List of Boxes
311

SocioEconomic Impacts through the Project iind Planning Cycle
99
Downstream Livelihoods i
116
Findings and Lessons
129
Energy and Electricity
148
Findings and Lessons
163
Compliance
185
From Global Review to Future Practise
198
Shared values and institutional practices the UN Millenium Report
203
Strategic Priorities A New Policy Framework
213
Taking the Initiative Insrtrurion il Responses
316
A Comment Medha Patkar
321
CJlos ir
349
List of Tables
351
Hams Water and Energy A Statistical Profile
368
United Nations Declarations
383
A Profile of the WCD Secretariat
397
189
402
Copyright

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About the author (2000)

Michael Lockwoodis Senior Lecturer, Environmental Planning, School of Geography & Environmental Studies, University of Tasmania, Australia. Graeme L. Worboysis Vice-Chair, Mountains Biome, IUCN World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA).

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