Dance for the Aina

Front Cover
Bess Press, 2003 - Families - 149 pages
0 Reviews
Dance for the 'Ā ina tells the story of a twelve-year-old hapahaole girl's move from California to Hawai'i with her family. Encountering prejudice, she learns about herself and others through the study of the ancient Hawaiian tradition of hula. Favorably reviewed by the International Reading Association, Kirkus, Horn Book, and other national review sources.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

DANCE FOR THE LAND

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

McLaren (Inside the Walls of Troy, 1996, etc.) writes of a girl's wish to understand her new surroundings, and to be understood by those who love her. When Kate's father decides to move back to his ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
6
Section 3
15
Section 4
25
Section 5
42
Section 6
50
Section 7
59
Section 8
67
Section 11
100
Section 12
106
Section 13
108
Section 14
114
Section 15
120
Section 16
129
Section 17
135
Section 18
144

Section 9
76
Section 10
84
Section 19
154
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Clemence McLaren writes:

"When I was a sixth grader, I used to read "The Odyssey" with a flashlight after I'd been sent to bed. I was both fascinated and frustrated when the women characters left their endless weaving to make brief, intriguing appearances in the men's hall. I always wanted to know how they felt about what was happening, but that was almost never revealed. Did Helen enjoy having the world's most beautiful face? Did Penelope blame her for launching the great war? And why did Circe keep changing men into pigs? I suppose I began retelling these stories to answer my own questions. When I became a teacher, I told my stories to my students, always embroidering on the characters' personalities.

"My fascination for Greece began with that early reading, and I grew up to live out my dreams for six years (on and off) in a tiny Greek village named Mylos, where we had a cottage between the one-room schoolhouse and the bakery.

"I now live in Hawaii, where I'm again studying the language and the legends, amazed at the parallels with Greek mythology. There's a Hawaiian Helen of Troy (named Hina), and a Polynesian equivalent to the Trojan horse (a wooden shark god, engineered to conceal enemy warriors). I'm still telling stories to my students, sharing my own passion for the classics and also teaching them to look more deeply for the silenced voices."

Clemence McLaren has also written "Inside the Walls of Troy" and "Dance for the Land.

Bibliographic information