Dancer

Front Cover
Dutton Children's Books, 1999 - Juvenile Fiction - 214 pages
2 Reviews
Stephanie lives for ballet. No parties, no goofing off, no junk food -- she spends every single afternoon in class at ballet school, and every weekend she practices on her own. No one seems to understand why she pushes herself so hard -- not her parents, not her classmates. Sometimes even her fellow dancers think she needs to loosen up and live a little.

Then three new people arrive in Stephanie's life: Anna, the pale, elegant young Russian girl who steals the lead in Sleeping Beauty; Vance, the arrogant, unmotivated, but phenomenally talented dancer who will take the role of the Prince; and Vance's Aunt Winnie, a strikingly beautiful older woman who once danced for Arthur Mitchell, founder of the Dance Theatre of Harlem. Thanks to Miss Winnie, Stephanie finds new courage to pursue the dream that many have told her is impossible: a future for herself as a professional dancer. Soon a small part of that dream is reserved for Vance, too, when Miss Winnie choreographs a pas de deux for them to learn together.

Ballet lovers will find themselves spellbound by this psychologically taut, believable story of a young black ballerina and the dancing that feeds her soul.

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Dancer

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Gr 6-10-At 16, nothing means more to Stephanie Haynes than ballet. Disappointed when a Russian newcomer is cast as the lead in The Sleeping Beauty, Stephanie wonders if anyone has ever heard of a ... Read full review

Review: Dancer

User Review  - S. - Goodreads

Well, I'm a ballet-lover, but I was certainly not spellbound. Stephanie wasn't that inspiring a character and I didn't really care when she didn't get the lead. Also, the cover is ugly. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
13
Section 2
28
Section 3
48
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Lorri Hewett wrote Soulfire while she was an undergraduate at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia.

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