Dangerous Days

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The Floating Press, Nov 1, 2010 - Fiction - 648 pages
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If you're a fan of tightly plotted historical mysteries, don't miss Mary Roberts Rinehart's Dangerous Days. This tale blends disparate elements such as industrial spies, intrigue among the American aristocracy, and the political and social climate that led up to World War I into a fast-paced and eminently satisfying read.
 

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User Review  - GTTexas - LibraryThing

A saccharine sweet WWI romance without a hint of mystery. Everyone is either long suffering, self sacrificing or a total "cad". It was enjoyable to me for a change of pace. Read full review

Contents

Chapter I
6
Chapter II
28
Chapter III
45
Chapter IV
55
Chapter V
65
Chapter VI
76
Chapter VII
92
Chapter VIII
98
Chapter XXVII
331
Chapter XXVIII
343
Chapter XXIX
352
Chapter XXX
366
Chapter XXXI
376
Chapter XXXII
390
Chapter XXXIII
401
Chapter XXXIV
417

Chapter IX
121
Chapter X
137
Chapter XI
159
Chapter XII
169
Chapter XIII
177
Chapter XIV
188
Chapter XV
198
Chapter XVI
207
Chapter XVII
221
Chapter XVIII
232
Chapter XIX
241
Chapter XX
249
Chapter XXI
260
Chapter XXII
269
Chapter XXIII
287
Chapter XXIV
296
Chapter XXV
304
Chapter XXVI
314
Chapter XXXV
427
Chapter XXXVI
436
Chapter XXXVII
461
Chapter XXXVIII
474
Chapter XXXIX
491
Chapter XL
504
Chapter XLI
512
Chapter XLII
521
Chapter XLIII
539
Chapter XLIV
548
Chapter XLV
564
Chapter XLVI
574
Chapter XLVII
595
Chapter XLVIII
611
Chapter XLIX
620
Chapter L
635
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Mary Roberts Rinehart was born in the City of Allegheny, Pennsylvania on August 12, 1876. While attending Allegheny High School, she received $1 each for three short stories from a Pittsburgh newspaper. After receiving inspiration from a town doctor who happened to be a woman, she developed a curiosity for medicine. She went on to study nursing at the Pittsburgh Training School for Nurses at Homeopathic Hospital. After graduating in 1896, she began her writing career. The first of her many mystery stories, The Circular Staircase (1908), established her as a leading writer of the genre; Rinehart and Avery Hopwood successfully dramatized the novel as The Bat (1920). Her other mystery novels include The Man in Lower Ten (1909), The Case of Jennie Brice (1914), The Red Lamp (1925), The Door (1930), The Yellow Room (1945), and The Swimming Pool (1952). Stories about Tish, a self-reliant spinster, first appeared in the Saturday Evening Post and were collected into The Best of Tish (1955). She wrote more than 50 books, eight plays, hundreds of short stories, poems, travelogues and special articles. Three of her plays were running on Broadway at one time. During World War I, she was the first woman war correspondent at the Belgian front. She died September 22, 1958 at the age of 82.

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