Daniel

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Nov 4, 2010 - Africans - 428 pages
2 Reviews
Henning Mankell is a worldwide phenomenon; his books have been translated into forty languages with more than 35 million copies in print, and both his critical acclaim and fan base only continue to grow. His new novel Daniel is an elegiac, unexpected story that only he could have told. In the 1870s, Hans Bengler arrives in Cape Town from Smland, Sweden, driven by a singular desire; to discover an insect no one has seen before and name it after himself. But then he impulsively adopts a young San orphan, a boy he christens Daniel and brings with him back to Sweden - a quite different specimen than he first contemplated. Daniel is told to call Bengler Father, taught to knock on doors and bow, and continually struggles to understand this strange new land of mud and snow that surrounds and seemingly entraps him. At the same time, he is haunted by visions of his murdered parents calling him home to Africa. Knowing that the only way home is by sea, he decides he must learn to walk on water if he is ever to reclaim his true place in the world. Evocative and sometimes brutal, the novel takes Daniel through a series of tragedies and betrayals that culminate in a shocking act. Mankell tells this indelible story with a ruthless elegance all his own.
 

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Contents

CHAPTER 1
3
CHAPTER 2
15
CHAPTER 3
25
CHAPTER 4
37
CHAPTER 5
50
CHAPTER 6
63
CHAPTER 7
76
CHAPTER 8
88
CHAPTER 16
202
CHAPTER 17
216
CHAPTER 18
230
Front Cover Back Cover Back Cover
238
CHAPTER 19
244
SON OF THE WIND
259
CHAPTER 20
261
CHAPTER 21
277

CHAPTER 9
102
THE ANTELOPE
115
CHAPTER 10
117
CHAPTER 11
130
CHAPTER 12
145
CHAPTER 13
158
CHAPTER 14
172
CHAPTER 15
187
CHAPTER 22
291
CHAPTER 23
306
CHAPTER 24
321
CHAPTER 25
335
CHAPTER 26
349
CHAPTER 27
363
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Henning Mankell was born in Stockholm, Sweden on February 3, 1948. He left secondary school at the age of 16 and worked as a merchant seaman. While working as a stagehand, he wrote his first play, The Amusement Park. His first novel, The Stone Blaster, was released in 1973. His other works included The Prison Colony that Disappeared, Daisy Sisters, The Eye of the Leopard, The Man from Beijing, Secrets in the Fire, The Chronicler of the Wind, Depths, and I Die, But My Memory Lives On. He also wrote the Kurt Wallander series, which have been adapted for film and television, and the Joel Gustafson Stories series. A Bridge to the Stars won the Rabén and Sjögren award for best children's book of the year. He was committed to the fight against AIDS. He helped build a village for orphaned children and devoted much of his spare time to his "memory books" project, where parents dying from AIDS are encouraged to record their life stories in words and pictures. He was also among the activists who were attacked and arrested by Israeli forces as they tried to sail to the Gaza strip with humanitarian supplies in June 2010. He died from cancer on October 5, 2015 at the age of 67.

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