Daniel Deronda

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The Floating Press, Jun 1, 2009 - Fiction - 946 pages
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Daniel Deronda meets the beautiful, extravagant Gwendolen in Germany and witnesses her great gambling losses which contribute to her family's bankruptcy. He then intervenes when she means to pawn her necklace, and the story splits, to narrate their two separate histories. Eliot's only novel set in her contemporary Victorian society, Daniel Deronda was a controversial work of moral and social questioning, which explored Jewish Zionism and Kaballism.
 

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Contents

Chapter XXXVI
704
Chapter XXXVII
745
Chapter XXXVIII
771
Chapter XXXIX
786
Chapter XL
804
BOOK VI REVELATIONS
830
Chapter XLI
831
Chapter XLII
843

Chapter VIII
136
Chapter IX
147
Chapter X
161
BOOK II MEETING STREAMS
176
Chapter XI
177
Chapter XII
202
Chapter XIII
212
Chapter XIV
238
Chapter XV
257
Chapter XVI
270
Chapter XVII
303
Chapter XVIII
321
BOOK III MAIDENS CHOOSING
332
Chapter XIX
333
Chapter XX
339
Chapter XXI
367
Chapter XXII
384
Chapter XXIII
407
Chapter XXIV
432
Chapter XXV
451
Chapter XXVI
467
Chapter XXVII
480
BOOK IV GWENDOLEN GETS HER CHOICE
497
Chapter XXVIII
498
Chapter XXIX
527
Chapter XXX
549
Chapter XXXI
573
Chapter XXXII
585
Chapter XXXIII
618
Chapter XXXIV
642
BOOK V MORDECAI
655
Chapter XXXV
656
Chapter XLIII
880
Chapter XLIV
891
Chapter XLV
906
Chapter XLXL
923
Chapter LXVII
942
Chapter XLVIII
952
Chapter XLIX
997
BOOK VII THE MOTHER AND THE SON
1002
Chapter L
1003
Chapter LI
1014
Chapter LII
1042
Chapter LIII
1073
Chapter LIV
1088
Chapter LV
1112
Chapter LVI
1119
BOOK VIII FRUIT AND SEED
1145
Chapter LVIII
1146
Chapter LIX
1160
Chapter LX
1170
Chapter LXI
1180
Chapter LXII
1197
Chapter LXIII
1210
Chapter LXIV
1227
Chapter LXV
1244
Chapter LXVI
1257
Chapter LXVII
1267
Chapter LXVIII
1280
Chapter LXIX
1290
Chapter LXX
1314
Endnotes
1321
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

George Eliot was born Mary Ann Evans on a Warwickshire farm in England, where she spent almost all of her early life. She received a modest local education and was particularly influenced by one of her teachers, an extremely religious woman whom the novelist would later use as a model for various characters. Eliot read extensively, and was particularly drawn to the romantic poets and German literature. In 1849, after the death of her father, she went to London and became assistant editor of the Westminster Review, a radical magazine. She soon began publishing sketches of country life in London magazines. At about his time Eliot began her lifelong relationship with George Henry Lewes. A married man, Lewes could not marry Eliot, but they lived together until Lewes's death. Eliot's sketches were well received, and soon after she followed with her first novel, Adam Bede (1859). She took the pen name "George Eliot" because she believed the public would take a male author more seriously. Like all of Eliot's best work, The Mill on the Floss (1860), is based in large part on her own life and her relationship with her brother. In it she begins to explore male-female relations and the way people's personalities determine their relationships with others. She returns to this theme in Silas Mariner (1861), in which she examines the changes brought about in life and personality of a miser through the love of a little girl. In 1863, Eliot published Romola. Set against the political intrigue of Florence, Italy, of the 1490's, the book chronicles the spiritual journey of a passionate young woman. Eliot's greatest achievement is almost certainly Middlemarch (1871). Here she paints her most detailed picture of English country life, and explores most deeply the frustrations of an intelligent woman with no outlet for her aspirations. This novel is now regarded as one of the major works of the Victorian era and one of the greatest works of fiction in English. Eliot's last work was Daniel Deronda. In that work, Daniel, the adopted son of an aristocratic Englishman, gradually becomes interested in Jewish culture and then discovers his own Jewish heritage. He eventually goes to live in Palestine. Because of the way in which she explored character and extended the range of subject matter to include simple country life, Eliot is now considered to be a major figure in the development of the novel. She is buried in Highgate Cemetery, North London, England, next to her common-law husband, George Henry Lewes.

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