Daphnis and Chloe

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Braziller, 1977 - Art - 222 pages
2 Reviews
Longus's romance tells the story of two teenagers, Daphnis and Chloe, who love each other but do not know how to make love. Around their predicament Longus weaves a fantasy which entertains and instructs, but never errs in taste. The hard toil and precariousness of peasant life are here, butso are its compensations--revelry, music, dance, and storytelling. Above the action brood divinities--Eros, Dionysus, Pan, the Nymphs--who collaborate to guide the adolescents into the mystery of Love, at once a sensual and a religious initiation. Daphnis and Chloe is the best known, and the best, of the early Greek romances, precursors to the modern novel. Admired by Goethe, it has been reinterpreted in music and art by Ravel and Chagall. This new translation is immensely readable, and does full justice to the humor and humanity of the story.

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User Review  - joanneb - LibraryThing

This is a story written by Longus between the 3rd and 5th century A.D. This version is a translation into English by George Thornley, published in 1657. A boy and a girl, by coincidence, were both ... Read full review

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User Review  - timspalding - LibraryThing

Not my favorite translation, but the work itself can't be beat. Read full review

Contents

Daphnis and Chloe Frontispiece
3
The Wolf Trap
19
Chloes Kiss
33
Copyright

4 other sections not shown

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About the author (1977)

The pastoral Daphnis and Chloe, the best of the ancient Greek romances, is attributed to Longus. Nothing is known of his life except what he states in his prologue to the work. His passionate love story of two foundlings raised together by shepherds on Lesbos is sweetly told and has been persistently admired for its bucolic charm.

George Moore was born in County Mayo, Ireland on February 24, 1852. He originally wanted to be a painter, and studied art in Paris during the 1870s. While in Paris, his first poetry collection, The Flowers of Passion, was self-published in 1877. He eventually decided to become a professional writer. In 1881, he published his second poetry collection, Pagan Poems. He wrote numerous poetry collections, short story collections, and novels including A Modern Lover (1883); A Mummer's Wife (1885); Esther Waters (1894); Sister Teresa (1901); The Brook Kerith (1916); and Aphroditis in Aulis (1930). He also found success as an art critic with books such as Impressions and Opinions (1891) and Modern Painting (1893). As an autobiographer, he wrote His Confessions of a Young Man (1888), Memoirs of My Dead Life (1906), and the trilogy Hail and Farewell! (1911-14). He also wrote the plays The Strike at Arlingford (1893) and Diarmuid and Grania (1901). He died of uraemia on January 21, 1933.

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