Dar?an: Seeing the Divine Image in India

Front Cover
Columbia University Press, 1998 - Religion - 115 pages
1 Review
The role of the visual is essential to Hindu tradition and culture, but many attempts to understand India's divine images have been laden with misperceptions. Darsan, a Sanskrit word that means "seeing," is an aid to our vision, a book of ideas to help us read, think, and look at Hindu images with appreciation and imagination.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Preface to the Second Edition
1
Seeing the Sacred A Darsan
3
B The Visible India
10
C Film Images
12
D The Image of God
16
E The Polytheistic Imagination
22
The Nature of the Hindu Image
32
B The Ritual Uses of the Image
44
B Image and Pilgrimage
63
Seeing the Divine Image in America
77
A Americas Murtis and Temples
81
The Process of Divine Embodiment
85
Notes
93
Bibliography
99
Note on Pronunciation
102
Glossary
103

C The Creation and Consecration of Images
51
D Festivals and Images
55
Image Temple and Pilgrimage
59

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

Diana L. Eck, professor of comparative religion and Indian studies, and director of The Pluralism Project at Harvard University, is the editor of On Common Ground: World Religions in America, a multimedia CD-ROM (Columbia).

Bibliographic information